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Tuesday, July 19, 2016 / Labels: , , ,

In photos: The Mazamas, 100+ years ago

July 19, 2016 /Photography News/ Have you ever wondered what your great-grandfather did for fun? While some undoubtedly whittled their lives away, others were out conquering the wilderness. If you’re from Oregon, ol’ grandpa might have even been part of the Mazamas.

On top of Mt. Hood, the original 105 charter members of the Mazamas founded their organization 122 years ago, on 19 July 1894. Since the organization’s founding, the Mazamas have fought for environmental preservation, built a number of lodges, named Mt. Mazama, and, of course, promoted and taught basic climbing education.


Mazamas hiking trip to Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Mazamas hiking trip to Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Image Title: Mazamas hiking through the snow on Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Image Title: Mazamas hiking through the snow on Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Image Title: Mountaineers in ice cave, Paradise Glacier, Mt. Rainier. Date Original: 1920. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Image Title: Mountaineers in ice cave, Paradise Glacier, Mt. Rainier. Date Original: 1920. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Image Title: Mountaineers on top of Mt. Snoqualmie. Date Original: 1915. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Image Title: Mountaineers on top of Mt. Snoqualmie. Date Original: 1915. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Image Title: Man with motion picture camera near glacier, Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Image Title: Man with motion picture camera near glacier, Mt. Rainier. Creator: Kiser Photo Co. Date Original: 1905. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Image Title: Mazamas or mountaineers group at Paradise Inn, Mt. Rainier. Date.Original: 1920. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection
Image Title: Mazamas or mountaineers group at Paradise Inn, Mt. Rainier. Date.Original: 1920. Original Form: Gelatin silver prints. Original Collection: Gerald W. Williams Collection


Photographs courtesy of the Oregon State University.



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Sunday, July 17, 2016 / Labels: , ,

Remembering Berenice Abbott: Changing New York (1935-1938)

July 17, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 118 years ago today, on 17 July 1898, Berenice Abbott (d. December 9, 1991) was an American photographer best known for her black-and-white photography of New York City architecture and urban design of the 1930s.

She proposed Changing New York, her grand project to document New York City, to the Federal Art Project (FAP) in 1935. The FAP was a Depression-era government program for unemployed artists and workers in related fields such as advertising, graphic design, illustration, photofinishing, and publishing. 

Abbott's efforts resulted in a book in 1939, in advance of the World's Fair in Flushing Meadow NY. At the project's conclusion, the FAP distributed complete sets of Abbott's images to high schools, libraries and other public institutions in the metropolitan area.

These images are a selection of New York Public Library holdings.

Herald Square, 34th and Broadway, Manhattan. July 16, 1936. Notes: Looking down from 'el' station at intersection of 34th and Broadway; pedestrians, traffice, Macy's and billboards, Saks at 34th St. Code: I.B. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Herald Square, 34th and Broadway, Manhattan. July 16, 1936. Notes: Looking down from 'el' station at intersection of 34th and Broadway; pedestrians, traffice, Macy's and billboards, Saks at 34th St. Code: I.B. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Pier 13, North River, Manhattan. April 09, 1936. Notes: Code: II.A.C.1. Lackawanna Railroad Freight station, pier 13, trucks and a wagon in front. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Pier 13, North River, Manhattan. April 09, 1936. Notes: Code: II.A.C.1. Lackawanna Railroad Freight station, pier 13, trucks and a wagon in front. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Talman Street, between Jay and Bridge street, Brooklyn. May 22, 1936. Notes: African American woman sits at street edge with two children, empty lots on either side of street, old 2 and 3 story clapboard houses further up. Code: I.A.5.; III.A.4. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Talman Street, between Jay and Bridge street, Brooklyn. May 22, 1936. Notes: African American woman sits at street edge with two children, empty lots on either side of street, old 2 and 3 story clapboard houses further up. Code: I.A.5.; III.A.4. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Gasoline station, Tremont Avenue and Dock Street, Bronx. July 02, 1936. Notes: Code: II.C.4. Exhibited: Modern Vision #86 Four gas pumps and tall Texaco sign at Abe's Plaza Gas station, with price for gas listed at 11 2/10 cents, cars washed for 95 cents. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Gasoline station, Tremont Avenue and Dock Street, Bronx. July 02, 1936. Notes: Code: II.C.4. Exhibited: Modern Vision #86 Four gas pumps and tall Texaco sign at Abe's Plaza Gas station, with price for gas listed at 11 2/10 cents, cars washed for 95 cents. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Ferry, Central Railroad of New Jersey, Foot of Liberty Street, Manhattan. August 12, 1936. Notes: Horizontal view of neg. #160; ferry building with cabs, vendors out front. Code: II.A.1.d. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Ferry, Central Railroad of New Jersey, Foot of Liberty Street, Manhattan. August 12, 1936. Notes: Horizontal view of neg. #160; ferry building with cabs, vendors out front. Code: II.A.1.d. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Broome Street, Nos. 504-506, Manhattan. October 09, 1935. Notes: Sign company with decorative ironwork along roof, auto radiator shop, in three-story buildings, the elevated railroad just visible at right. Code: I.A.2. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Broome Street, Nos. 504-506, Manhattan. October 09, 1935. Notes: Sign company with decorative ironwork along roof, auto radiator shop, in three-story buildings, the elevated railroad just visible at right. Code: I.A.2. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Newsstand, 32nd Street and Third Avenue, Manhattan. November 19, 1935. Notes: Code: III.1.f. Exhibited: Modern Vision #56 Newstand next to State Coffee Shoppe, large display of magazines, ads for sundaes, Coca-Cola above, boxes of sodas below, man at left. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Newsstand, 32nd Street and Third Avenue, Manhattan. November 19, 1935. Notes: Code: III.1.f. Exhibited: Modern Vision #56 Newstand next to State Coffee Shoppe, large display of magazines, ads for sundaes, Coca-Cola above, boxes of sodas below, man at left. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Oak and New Chambers Streets, Manhattan. October 28, 1935. Notes: Code: III.B.1. Exhibited: Modern Vision #57 Festive lights in curlicue designs arch over street, men with tall ladder, wagons, cars, billboards; 'el' and Municipal Bldg. just visible. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Oak and New Chambers Streets, Manhattan. October 28, 1935. Notes: Code: III.B.1. Exhibited: Modern Vision #57 Festive lights in curlicue designs arch over street, men with tall ladder, wagons, cars, billboards; 'el' and Municipal Bldg. just visible. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Oak and New Chambers Streets, Manhattan. October 28, 1935. Notes: Code: III.B.1. Exhibited: Modern Vision #57 Festive lights in curlicue designs arch over street, men with tall ladder, wagons, cars, billboards; 'el' and Municipal Bldg. just visible. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Blossom Restaurant, 103 Bowery, Manhattan. October 03, 1935. Notes: Code: II.C.1. Exhibited: Modern Vision #59 Men stand at entrance to barbershop, pole in front, under the Blossom Restaurant, which has menu painted on windows and board out front. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Fulton Street Dock, Manhattan skyline, Manhattan. November 26, 1935. Notes: Code: I.D. Men walk on pier where sailing vessels are moored, skyline beyond. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.
Fulton Street Dock, Manhattan skyline, Manhattan. November 26, 1935. Notes: Code: I.D. Men walk on pier where sailing vessels are moored, skyline beyond. Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.

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Friday, July 15, 2016 / Labels: ,

Illuminating photography: From camera obscura to camera phone

history of photography, history of photo camera, photography news, photography, diana topan, camera obscura, camera phone, evolution of cameras

July 15, 2016 /Photography News/ A TED Ed lesson by Eva Timothy that tracks the trajectory from the most rudimentary cameras to the ubiquity of them today.


Lesson by Eva Timothy, animation by London Squared Productions.


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Tuesday, July 12, 2016 / Labels: , ,

Remembering George Eastman, founder of Kodak, inventor of roll film

July 12, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 162 years ago, on July 12, 1854,  George Eastman was an American inventor and philanthropist. He founded the Eastman Kodak Company and invented roll film, helping to bring photography to the mainstream. Roll film was also the basis for the invention of motion picture film in 1888 by the world's first filmmaker Louis Le Prince, and a few years later by his followers Léon Bouly, Thomas Edison, the Lumière Brothers and Georges Méliès.

George Eastman. Part of Bain News Service collection.
George Eastman. Part of Bain News Service collection.
In 1884, Eastman patented the first film in roll form to prove practicable; in 1888 he perfected the Kodak camera, the first camera designed specifically for roll film. In 1892, he established the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York, one of the first firms to mass-produce standardized photography equipment. This company also manufactured the flexible transparent film, devised by Eastman in 1889, which proved vital to the subsequent development of the motion picture industry.

Page 1 of George Eastman's patent no. 388,850, for his film camera and roll film. 4 September 1888
Page 1 of George Eastman's patent no. 388,850, for his film camera and roll film. 4 September 1888

During his lifetime, he donated $100 million, mostly to the University of Rochester and to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (under the alias "Mr. Smith"). The Rochester Institute of Technology has a building dedicated to Mr. Eastman, in recognition of his support and substantial donations.

In his final two years, Eastman was in intense pain, caused by a degenerative disorder affecting his spine. He had trouble standing and his walking became a slow shuffle. Today it might be diagnosed as lumbar spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal canal caused by calcification in the vertebrae. Eastman grew depressed, as he had seen his mother spend the last two years of her life in a wheelchair from the same condition. On March 14, 1932, Eastman died by suicide with a single gunshot to the heart, leaving a note which read, "My work is done. Why wait?" His funeral was held at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Rochester; he was buried on the grounds of the company he founded at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York.

His former home at 900 East Avenue in Rochester, New York was opened as the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film in 1949. 

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Friday, July 8, 2016 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Remembering controversial photographer F. Holland Day

July 8, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 152 years ago, on July 8, 1864, Fred Holland Day was a dedicated aesthete and well-known figure in turn-of-the-century Boston. He was one of the earliest advocates of Pictorial photography in America and, like Alfred Stieglitz (with whom he corresponded until they had a serious disagreement around 1902), he tirelessly wrote articles, mounted exhibitions, and encouraged like-minded photographers who supported the medium's artistic potential.

'Youth sitting on a stone'', 1907, F. Holland Day. Model is the Italian Nicola Giancola.
'Youth sitting on a stone'', 1907, F. Holland Day. Model is the Italian Nicola Giancola.

Day's life and works had long been controversial, since his photographic subjects were often nude male youths. Pam Roberts, in F. Holland Day (Waanders Pub, 2001; catalog of a Day exhibition at the Van Gogh Museum) writes: "Day never married and his sexual orientation, whilst it is widely assumed that he was homosexual, because of his interests, his photographic subject matter, his general flamboyant demeanor, was, like much else about him, a very private matter."

Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book ''Suffering the ideal''.
Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book ''Suffering the ideal''.
Day spent much time among poor immigrant children in Boston, tutoring them in reading and mentoring them. One in particular, the 13-year-old Lebanese immigrant Kahlil Gibran, went on to fame as the author of The Prophet.

Kahlil Gibran in Middle Eastern costume with leopard skin and staff, seated, ca. 1898, F. Holland Day. 1 photographic print on 2 mounts: platinum print. Forms part of the Louise Imogen Guiney Collection. Anonymous gift to the Library of Congress, 1934.
Kahlil Gibran in Middle Eastern costume with leopard skin and staff, seated, ca. 1898, F. Holland Day. 1 photographic print on 2 mounts: platinum print. Forms part of the Louise Imogen Guiney Collection. Anonymous gift to the Library of Congress, 1934.
Probably his best-known work is an 1898 series of more than 250 photographs portraying the Passion of Christ, in which he posed as Jesus, training for the role by losing weight and letting his hair and beard grow. What is usually shown from this series is the group known as “The Seven Last Words of Christ,” seven portraits that refer to Jesus’ statements from the time of his crucifixion until his death. In each photograph Mr. Day, in character, assumed what he felt were facial expressions consonant with Jesus’ ordeal.
The Last Seven Words of Christ, 1898, F. Holland Day
The Last Seven Words of Christ, 1898, F. Holland Day
Day often made only a single print from a negative. He used only the platinum process, being unsatisfied with any other, and lost interest in photography when platinum became unobtainable following the Russian Revolution.

F. Holland Day died on November 12, 1933.

Since the 1990s Day's works have been included in major exhibitions by museum curators, notably in the solo Day retrospective at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 2000/2001 and similar shows at the Royal Photographic Society in England and the Fuller Museum of Art. Art historians are once again taking an interest in Day, and there are now significant academic texts on Day's homoerotic portraiture, and its similarities to the work of Walter Pater and Thomas Eakins.

Day's house at 93 Day Street, Norwood, Massachusetts is now a museum (The F. Holland Day House & Norwood History Museum), and the headquarters of the Norwood Historical Society.

Saint Sebastian, 1906, F. Holland Day
Saint Sebastian, 1906, F. Holland Day

Beauty is Truth, Truth is Beauty, 1898, F. Holland Day
Beauty is Truth, Truth is Beauty, 1898, F. Holland Day

Black man with diadema, ca. 1897, F. Holland Day
Black man with diadema, ca. 1897, F. Holland Day

No title, ca. 1900, F. Holland Day
No title, ca. 1900, F. Holland Day

Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book Suffering the ideal.
Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book Suffering the ideal.

Tony Costanza in sailor suit, seated, leaning on pillows, 1911, F. Holland Day
Tony Costanza in sailor suit, seated, leaning on pillows, 1911, F. Holland Day

Portrait of Edward Carpenter, the early gay rights activist, F. Holland Day
Portrait of Edward Carpenter, the early gay rights activist, F. Holland Day

Amercian poet and essayist Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920) in Saint Barbara costume with laurel wreath, pearls, book and (pencilled-in) halo, 1893, F. Holland Day
Amercian poet and essayist Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920) in Saint Barbara costume with laurel wreath, pearls, book and (pencilled-in) halo, 1893, F. Holland Day

Woman (Julia Arthur) in Middle Eastern (Salome?) costume, ca. 1895, F. Holland Day
Woman (Julia Arthur) in Middle Eastern (Salome?) costume, ca. 1895, F. Holland Day
 

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Sunday, July 3, 2016 / Labels: , ,

#MOOC: Stereoscopy - an Introduction to Victorian Stereo Photography


July 2, 2016 /Photography NewsDiscover why the stereoscope and stereo photography mesmerised Victorians when they first appeared at 1851’s Great Exhibition.


ABOUT THE COURSE

Starts: 1 Aug 2016
Duration: 2 weeks, 3 hours pw
Certificates available
Educator: Christine McLean

Following its presentation to the world at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, the stereoscope – a device that makes images appear 3D – mesmerised Victorians. Collecting and viewing stereo photographs became a craze.

Stereoscopes were produced in different price ranges, thousands of stereo images were printed and bought each year, and one company involved in this boom, The London Stereoscopic Company, proclaimed: ‘No home without a stereoscope.’

Explore the origins of the stereoscope and stereo photography

‘Stereoscopy’ derives from the Greek ‘stereos’ meaning ‘firm’ or ‘solid’ and ‘skopeō’ meaning ‘to look’ or ‘to see’. So together, they mean ‘seeing something firm or solid’.

On this free online course, we will examine the rise of stereo photography and the work of two pioneering photographers – the Scotsman, George Washington Wilson, and the Englishman, Thomas Richard Williams.

We will explore how the stereoscope, originally created by inventor Sir Charles Wheatstone to investigate human binocular vision, was improved by scientist Sir David Brewster, to become a vital, elaborate drawing room essential.

Enjoy stereo photography from National Museums Scotland collection

To enjoy stereo photography, you usually need a stereoscope or stereo viewer, but you can enjoy this course without one.

It has been developed following the major exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland, Photography: A Victorian Sensation, and many of the images you will explore in this course are drawn from the National Museums Scotland collection.

REQUIREMENTS

This course is open to anyone with an interest in photography or Victorian history. No previous knowledge or experience is required.

To register, go here: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/stereoscopy



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Monday, June 20, 2016 / Labels: ,

World Refugee Day: 15 storytelling photos of refugees around the world

June 20, 2016 /Photography News/ Observed on June 20 each year, the World Refugee Day is dedicated to raising awareness of the situation of refugees throughout the world.

The day was created in 2000 by a special United Nations General Assembly Resolution. June 20 had previously been commemorated as African Refugee Day in a number of African countries.

These photos tell stories of men, women, and children who have fled their country under danger of discrimination, conflict, and aggression, to find safety and shelter elsewhere in the world. 

Refugee in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez
Refugee in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez

A family of the Madi tribe returns home from a refugee camp in Uganda, unable to go back to their family plot, occupied by the Internally Displaced Persons from other parts of southern Sudan. 28/10/2008. Nimule, Sudan. UN Photo/Tim McKulka. www.un.org/av/photo
A family of the Madi tribe returns home from a refugee camp in Uganda, unable to go back to their family plot, occupied by the Internally Displaced Persons from other parts of southern Sudan.
28/10/2008. Nimule, Sudan. UN Photo/Tim McKulka. www.un.org/av/photo

Bahn refugee camp, 50 km from the Liberia/Ivory Coast border. This camp, set up by UNHCR, has capacity for 15,000 refugees. At the time the picture was taken, it was accomodating about 2,000 - but more people are arriving from Ivory Coast every day, fleeing the fierce fighting and political unrest there. The UK government is providing an urgent emergency aid package to help tens of thousands of people affected by the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Liberia and the Ivory Coast. Photo: Department for International Development/Derek Markwell
Bahn refugee camp, 50 km from the Liberia/Ivory Coast border. This camp, set up by UNHCR, has capacity for 15,000 refugees. At the time the picture was taken, it was accomodating about 2,000 - but more people are arriving from Ivory Coast every day, fleeing the fierce fighting and political unrest there. The UK government is providing an urgent emergency aid package to help tens of thousands of people affected by the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Liberia and the Ivory Coast. Photo: Department for International Development/Derek Markwell

Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez
Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez

Woman and children in Turkish refugee camp at the end of the first Gulf War. Photo: Brian Kelly
Woman and children in Turkish refugee camp at the end of the first Gulf War. Photo: Brian Kelly

Coping with disasters: Refugees and displaced persons in Southeast Asia. An elderly refugee resting at the Lubhini Transit Centre in Bangkok, Thailand. There are about 2,000 refugees in this camp from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos and they will be going to the United States, Canada, Italy and France. 01/07/1979. Bangkok, Thailand. UN Photo/John Isaac. www.unmultimedia.org/photo/
Coping with disasters: Refugees and displaced persons in Southeast Asia. An elderly refugee resting at the Lubhini Transit Centre in Bangkok, Thailand. There are about 2,000 refugees in this camp from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos and they will be going to the United States, Canada, Italy and France. 01/07/1979. Bangkok, Thailand. UN Photo/John Isaac. www.unmultimedia.org/photo/

Rohingya children in the Nayapara refugee camp. The Rohingyas are a persecuted ethnic and religious minority from Myanmar, and the groups in Cox's Bazar fled that persecution in 1991 to live in Bangladesh. Photo: Ruben Flamarique/Austcare
Rohingya children in the Nayapara refugee camp. The Rohingyas are a persecuted ethnic and religious minority from Myanmar, and the groups in Cox's Bazar fled that persecution in 1991 to live in Bangladesh. Photo: Ruben Flamarique/Austcare

Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez
Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez

Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez
Refugees in Malta. Photo: Olmo Calvo Rodríguez

Boho refugee camp, Somalia. Photo: Frank Keillor
Boho refugee camp, Somalia. Photo: Frank Keillor

Dheisheh refugee camp, Bethlehem, Palestine. Photo: Reham Alhelsi
Dheisheh refugee camp, Bethlehem, Palestine. Photo: Reham Alhelsi

Burmese refugee project. Photo: Saoire O'Brien
Burmese refugee project. Photo: Saoire O'Brien

Refugee women at the Shamshatoo camp at a frontier province in North-West Pakistan. The camp was a temporary home to some 70,000 Afghan refugees. 12/03/2001. Pakistan. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe. www.un.org/av/photo/
Refugee women at the Shamshatoo camp at a frontier province in North-West Pakistan. The camp was a temporary home to some 70,000 Afghan refugees. 12/03/2001. Pakistan. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe. www.un.org/av/photo/

Kosovar refugees fleeing their homeland. [Blace area, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia] 01/03/1999. Blace. UN Photo/R LeMoyne. www.un.org/av/photo/
Kosovar refugees fleeing their homeland. [Blace area, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia]
01/03/1999. Blace. UN Photo/R LeMoyne. www.un.org/av/photo/

De-Deur refugee camp. Arine Tusenge from Burundi is among refugees that found themselves out in the open again after several they were evicted from a shelter on the Vaal, South Africa.They had been moved to the shelter after 2008's xenophobia related attacks. They fear re-intergration into society and prefer to stay in the open.01-10-09. Photo: Tawedzerwa Zhou
De-Deur refugee camp. Arine Tusenge from Burundi is among refugees that found themselves out in the open again after several they were evicted from a shelter on the Vaal, South Africa.They had been moved to the shelter after 2008's xenophobia related attacks. They fear re-intergration into society and prefer to stay in the open.01-10-09. Photo: Tawedzerwa Zhou 

See also: Sahrawi: Maghreb's Forgotten Refugees, by Paulo Nunes dos Santos


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Friday, June 17, 2016 / Labels: ,

In Photos: Remembering photographer Frederick Hollyer

June 17, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 178 years ago today, on 17 June 1838, Frederick Hollyer was an English photographer and engraver known for his photographic reproductions of paintings and drawings, particularly those of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, and for portraits of literary and artistic figures of late Victorian and Edwardian London.

Hollyer became interested in photography about 1860. Under the patronage of painter and sculptor Frederic Leighton, Hollyer began to photograph paintings and drawings in the 1870s. Artists whose work he published include Edward Burne-Jones, George Frederic Watts, Simeon Solomon, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

Hollyer's photographs of drawings were particularly successful; printed on high-quality paper, they were often mistaken for originals. One of the most popular was a study of three heads by Burne-Jones for The Masque of Cupid.

Hollyer also took studio portraits and specialized in interior and exterior photos of houses. For 30 years, he reserved Mondays for portrait photography in his Pembroke Square studio. His sitters included the artists Walter Crane, William Morris, G. F. Watts, and Burne-Jones; the writers John Ruskin, H. G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw; and the actresses Mrs Patrick Campbell and Ellen Terry.

Hollyer eschewed the formal poses of most studio portraiture of his day.

Hollyer joined the Royal Photographic Society 1865 and became a Fellow in 1895, but was also involved in The Linked Ring, a society formed in to support pictorialism in opposition to the Photographic Society. He was a member of the Solar Club and became one of the Founder Members of the Professional Photographers' Association in 1901.

Frederick Hollyer died 21 November 1933 at his eldest son's home in Blewbury (then part of Berkshire), aged 95. (Source: Wikipedia)

Self-portrait of Frederick Hollyer, from the journal Photograms of '95. London: Dawbarn & Ward, 1895 About 1890. Platinum print, width 9.5 cm x height 7.7 cm
Self-portrait of Frederick Hollyer, from the journal Photograms of '95. London: Dawbarn & Ward, 1895 About 1890. Platinum print, width 9.5 cm x height 7.7 cm

Portrait of John Ruskin by Frederick Hollyer, 1894.
Portrait of John Ruskin by Frederick Hollyer, 1894.

Platinum print photographic portrait of Bowyer Nichols, J. W. Mackail, and H. C. Breeding, c. 1882. Scanned from The Earthly Paradise: Arts and Crafts by Wiliam Morris and his Circle in Canadian Collections, edited by Katharine A. Lochnan, Douglas E. Schoenherr, and Carole Silver, Key Porter Books, 1993
Platinum print photographic portrait of Bowyer Nichols, J. W. Mackail, and H. C. Breeding, c. 1882. Scanned from The Earthly Paradise: Arts and Crafts by Wiliam Morris and his Circle in Canadian Collections, edited by Katharine A. Lochnan, Douglas E. Schoenherr, and Carole Silver, Key Porter Books, 1993

Portrait of William Morris, aged 53. First published 1899 (photo c. 1887)
Portrait of William Morris, aged 53. First published 1899 (photo c. 1887)

Platinum print photographic portrait of Georgiana Burne-Jones, c. 1882. Scanned from The Earthly Paradise: Arts and Crafts by Wiliam Morris and his Circle in Canadian Collections, edited by Katharine A. Lochnan, Douglas E. Schoenherr, and Carole Silver, Key Porter Books, 1993
Platinum print photographic portrait of Georgiana Burne-Jones, c. 1882. Scanned from The Earthly Paradise: Arts and Crafts by Wiliam Morris and his Circle in Canadian Collections, edited by Katharine A. Lochnan, Douglas E. Schoenherr, and Carole Silver, Key Porter Books, 1993

The families of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones, photographed by Frederick Hollyer in the garden at The Grange, Burne-Jones's home in Fulham. Left to right: Edward Jones (Burne-Jones's father), Margaret Burne-Jones, Edward Burne-Jones, Philip Burne-Jones, Georgiana Burne-Jones, May Morris, William Morris, Jane Morris, and Jenny Morris. Platinotype photograph, 14 x 13.1 cm, 1874. Scanned from Linda Parry, William Morris, Abrams 1996
The families of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones, photographed by Frederick Hollyer in the garden at The Grange, Burne-Jones's home in Fulham. Left to right: Edward Jones (Burne-Jones's father), Margaret Burne-Jones, Edward Burne-Jones, Philip Burne-Jones, Georgiana Burne-Jones, May Morris, William Morris, Jane Morris, and Jenny Morris. Platinotype photograph, 14 x 13.1 cm, 1874. Scanned from Linda Parry, William Morris, Abrams 1996

Edward Burne-Jones's garden studio at the Grange, photographed by Frederick Hollyer 1887. Scanned from Wildman, Stephen: Edward Burne-Jones: Victorian Artist-Dreamer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998
Edward Burne-Jones's garden studio at the Grange, photographed by Frederick Hollyer 1887. Scanned from Wildman, Stephen: Edward Burne-Jones: Victorian Artist-Dreamer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998



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Thursday, June 16, 2016 / Labels: , , ,

Pareidolia: Why we see what isn’t there

A happy face on Mars. Image credit: NASA
June 16, 2016 /Photography News/ A cloud resembling an angel reassures some – and terrifies others. Traffic jams stretch for blocks as people flock to see the Virgin Mary on a bathroom window. Photos of Martian rocks resembling people, rats and crabs go viral in an instant.

That’s the power of pareidolia, a peculiar, but entirely natural, function of the human brain that causes us to impose patterns on random collections of images and sounds.

From the Greek para-, “alongside of, instead of” and eidolon, “image, shape,” it’s an ancient ability that may have benefited survival in the far distant past, when it was essential to pick out hidden dangers in the landscape. Notably, Carl Sagan made this claim in his 1995 book The Demon-Haunted World – Science as a Candle in the Dark, asserting that it is a phenomenon that results from how our brains interpret light and shadows (sometimes making meaning from these features when there is none).

FAMILIAR SHAPES IN STRANGE PLACES

Pareidolia accounts for ancient tales of tree dwelling dryads, trolls who guard gardens and bridges, and stone giants. It’s what lets us see shapes in the contours of clouds, find a face on the surface of the moon, and trace the constellations in the night sky.

And while that’s been in existence for all of our history, pareidolia has gone from psychology textbooks to the popular imagination in recent years, thanks to media attention. We have countless reports of religious figures seen in peculiar places and a constant stream of photographs sent by the Curiosity Rover from the surface of Mars to inspire our imaginations.

Watch: The Face on Mars




Pareidolia explains the famous Virgin Mary on a cheese sandwich, which sold on eBay for $28,000, the cornflake shaped like the state of Illinois auctioned off for $1350, and even the much revered Shroud of Turin, which to many observers reflects the figure of a crucified Christ.

NOW YOU SEE IT – NOW I DON’T

Interestingly, not everyone experiences pareidolia in the same way – or at all – and it seems that it is influenced by culture. Psychologists note that seeing meaning in random data is more likely among people with strong beliefs in religion or the paranormal. That accounts for the large number of instances of pareidolia involving religious symbols or figures ranging from that aforementioned Shroud, to sightings of the Hindu monkey god in a Singapore tree, and the name of Allah in photographs of the 2004 tsunami in Asia.

Even if many people see the same image, they may interpret it differently. The Man in the Moon that every Western child knows is the Moon Rabbit in Asia. It is known as the Moon Buffalo, Dragon or Frog in various other cultures. That’s also the reason you may argue with a friend about what shape you see in the fluffy cloud scudding overhead.

AUDITORY PAREIDOLIA

Pareidolia isn’t limited to seeing. Auditory pareidolia refers to the phenomenon of finding meaning in random sounds, such as the electronic voice phenomena that ghost hunters claim is evidence of spirits speaking from beyond the grave. It also accounts for the rumored hidden messages in rock and pop music albums, like the belief among Beatles fans that certain tracks played backwards revealed the words “Paul is dead.”

PAREIDOLIA IN ART AND SCIENCE

It may seem that pareidolia leads only to silly and sometimes creepy outcomes. But psychologists exploit it through tests like the Rorschach inkblots, where the shapes seen in random ink spatters are thought to reveal insights into a subject’s subconscious. Artists also play with pareidolia, creating images that can be seen in various ways. Georgia O’Keefe’s flower paintings, for example, outrage some viewers – and delight others – who see in them suggestions of female genitalia.

The human brain’s tendency toward pareidolia hasn’t changed in thousands of years. It’s even migrated to the digital world in the form of facial recognition and mapping software. And even computer brains can be fooled by what they see, finding human faces on everything from keys to garage doors and rock formations, just as the ancients did. Ultimately, this once again shows why you need to question absolutely everything.

Source: Futurism.com


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