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Monday, February 27, 2017 / Labels: ,

In Photos: Remembering Robert Macpherson, the first to photograph inside the Vatican

February 27, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 203 years ago on February 27, 1814, Robert Turnbull Macpherson was a Scottish artist and photographer who worked in Rome, Italy in the 19th century.

During his initial years in Rome, Macpherson practiced his art as a painter. While records exist of several works between 1840 and 1845, his only known surviving work is a large oil painting of the Roman Campagna, dated 1842. In addition to painting, he worked as an art dealer.

In 1851, having failed to achieve notice as a painter, Macpherson turned to the new art of photography, using albumin on glass negatives. By 1856 he had transitioned to collodio-albumin, allowing the easier transport of dry plates. He typically utilized large-format negatives and long exposure times to attain exceptional detail of Roman architecture, monuments, ruins, landscapes, and sculptures. His work emphasized careful composure of scenes to capture three-dimensional architectural relationships on the two-dimensional photographic medium. Macpherson emphasized the artistic aspects of his photography, stating in 1863 that "I remain a photographer to this day, without any feeling that by doing so I have abandoned art, or have in any way forfeited my claim to the title of artist."

By the early 1860s, Macpherson's photographic career was near its zenith, with exhibitions in Edinburgh and London. His work received critical acclaim, with "subjects chosen with fine taste and the pictures executed with skill and delicacy."

Macpherson was the first photographer permitted to photograph inside the Vatican, and in 1863 published Vatican Sculptures, Selected and Arranged in the Order in which they are Found in the Galleries, a guide book to 125 Vatican sculptures featuring woodcut illustrations carved by his wife from his photographs.

By the late 1860s Macpherson's fortunes were in decline. His health had deteriorated due to malaria, and the increasing political instability in Rome reduced the stream of British tourists that made up much of his customer base. At the same time, technical advances in photography moved the medium from the realm of artists to that of a commodity.

Robert Macpherson died on 17 November 1872, and was buried at San Lorenzo fuori le Mura in Rome, though his grave has since been lost.

Over the course of his photography career, Macpherson cataloged 1,019 photographs. Today, a significant number of Macpherson works are held at the George Eastman House, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Courtauld Institute of Art, and the British School at Rome. Smaller collections are found worldwide.

Roma - Trinita dei Monti, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Roma - Trinita dei Monti, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Tomba di Cecilia Metella, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Tomba di Cecilia Metella, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)

Temple of Vesta at Tivoli, ca. 1858, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Temple of Vesta at Tivoli, ca. 1858, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)


Rome - St. Peter's Dome in the Vatican, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Rome - St. Peter's Dome in the Vatican, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Rome - Loggia of Raphael in the Vatican Palace, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Rome - Loggia of Raphael in the Vatican Palace, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)

Rome - Trajan's Forum and column, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
Rome - Trajan's Forum and column, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)

The Chiaramonti Museum, one among the Vatican Museums, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)
The Chiaramonti Museum, one among the Vatican Museums, Before 1872, By Robert MacPherson (1811-1872)

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Sunday, February 26, 2017 / Labels: , ,

In photos: Remembering Karl Bulla, the father of photo-reporting in Russia

February 26, 2017 /Photography News/  Born in Leobschütz in Prussia on February 26, 1855 (or 1853 -- his exact birth year is unclear), Carl Oswald Bulla was a prominent Russian photographer, often referred as the "father of photo-reporting in Russia".

In 1865 Bulla ran away from his family in Russia, to St. Petersburg, where 10 years later he opened his first photographic studio, and in 1886 he received the permit from the St. Petersburg Police allowing him to take pictures anywhere outside his studio and to become more involved into photography of city life.

At the end of the 19th century newspaper printing technology allowed the publishing of photographs. In 1894 Russian Department of Post and Telegraphs also allowed use of postcards. Both events significantly increased the demand for Bulla's images. At that time, his advertisment read: "The oldest photographer-illustrator Karl Bulla photographs for the illustrated magazines anything and anywhere without limits from the landscape or the building, indoor or outdoor day or night at the artificial light".

In 1916 Bulla passed the management of his firm "Bulla and sons" to his sons Alexander and Victor and moved to Ösel Island (currently Saaremaa, Estonia). He lived a quiet life there, photographing the local ethnographic material and teaching Estonian boys the basics of photography until his death in 1929.

In 1935 the son of Karl, Victor Bulla donated to the State Archive of Leningrad District 132,683 negatives of Bulla's photographs. The archive grew and now consists of more than 200,000 negatives of works by Karl Bulla and his sons. 

Left: Medical inspection (or medical study), 1900s. Right: Group with poles, 1900s
Left: Medical inspection (or medical study), 1900s. Right: Group with poles, 1900s                                                                                                                 

Left: 1900s. Right: Lunch in the kitchen for the poor, 1910
Left: 1900s. Right: Lunch in the kitchen for the poor, 1910

Left: Street scene. Right: Ukrainian/Russian aviators Igor Sikorsky,Genner, Kaulbars in the airplane "Russian Vityaz", 1915
Left: Street scene. Right: Ukrainian/Russian aviators Igor Sikorsky,Genner, Kaulbars in the airplane "Russian Vityaz", 1915

Left: Self-portrait by Karl Bulla. Middle: Grigory Rasputin, Major General Putyatin and Colonel Lotman, 1904-1905. Right: Leonid Andreyev and his wife, Countess Anna Wielhorska, 1903
Left: Self-portrait by Karl Bulla. Middle: Grigory Rasputin, Major General Putyatin and Colonel Lotman, 1904-1905. Right: Leonid Andreyev and his wife, Countess Anna Wielhorska, 1903

Left: Leo Tolstoy, 1902. Right: Vladimir Bekhterev
Left: Leo Tolstoy, 1902. Right: Vladimir Bekhterev

Left: Catastrophy of Egyptian Bridge in Saint Petersburg, February 2, 1905. Right: Apraksin Dvor on fire, July 3, 1914
Left: Catastrophy of Egyptian Bridge in Saint Petersburg, February 2, 1905. Right: Apraksin Dvor on fire, July 3, 1914

Left: Former Deputies of Russian State Duma arrive to Vyborg to sign the Vyborg Manifesto, July 1906. Right: Photo taken in May 1912
Left: Former Deputies of Russian State Duma arrive to Vyborg to sign the Vyborg Manifesto, July 1906. Right: Photo taken in May 1912

Left: Trams ride on the ice of Newa river, Saint-Petersburg, end of 19th or just the beginning of 20tn century. Photo from the collection of Hermitage museum, cca. 1900. Right: Ilya Repin reads the news about Leo Tolstoy death. Present Korney Chukovsky and Nordman-Severova (Repin's wife). November 1910, Kuokkala
Left: Trams ride on the ice of Newa river, Saint-Petersburg, end of 19th or just the beginning of 20tn century. Photo from the collection of Hermitage museum, cca. 1900. Right: Ilya Repin reads the news about Leo Tolstoy death. Present Korney Chukovsky and Nordman-Severova (Repin's wife). November 1910, Kuokkala

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Saturday, February 25, 2017 / Labels: , ,

Free online course: Improving your image - dental photography in practice

February 25, 2017 /Photography News/ Learn how to achieve consistent and excellent results in all aspects of dental photography.

Starts on March 6, 2017
Duration: 4 weeks, 5 hours/week
Certificates available
Educator: Mike Sharland

About the course:

This free course will cover all aspects of the use of digital photography in dental practice: intra-oral, extra-oral, and portraits. Participants will be taken through photography, from the basics of choosing correct equipment and setting it up, to optimum settings, techniques for consistent imaging and the safe storage of images.

The course is taught by the team that delivers the online masters degree course in Advanced General Dental Practice from the School of Dentistry at the University of Birmingham UK, and will involve about six hours per week of your time.

Requirements:

No previous knowledge is necessary, but there will be certain requirements in terms of equipment necessary to complete the course - particularly access to a digital SLR camera. Advice on choosing this will be given at the start of the course, but if you’re keen to get a head start, then you can download Equipment Recommendations (PDF, 232k).


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The fascinating technique that lets you capture sound waves on camera

February 25, 2017 /Photography News/ Did you ever wonder what different sounds look like? Thanks to the science behind the Schlieren Flow Visualization you can see and capture the differences in air pressure caused by various forces such as sound or heat.

So, how does it work?

Here is a graphic that depicts how we are able to photograph movement in the airwaves, thus creating sound waves, by using a a series of objects to reflect and divert the waves for the camera to be able to capture it.

How to photograph sound


This results in a photograph - like the one below - which shows the sound waves created by a pair of clapping hands.

The fascinating technique that lets you capture sound waves on camera explained


Check out the full video here, and tell us what sounds you'd most like to see in the comments box.


And here is how you can create your own DIY Schlieren Flow Visualization: http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Schlieren-Flow-Visualization/

Want more information on the Schlieren photography technique? Check out the great resources below:

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Tuesday, February 21, 2017 / Labels: , , ,

Polaroid: 70 years of instant photography

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95. Photo: Eugene Ilchenko
Polaroid Land Camera Model 95. Photo: Eugene Ilchenko
February 21, 2017 /Photography News/ 70 years ago today, on February 21, 1947, Edwin Land (1909 - 1991) --the co-founder of the Polaroid Corporation-- demonstrated the first instant camera with self-developing film, using a patented chemical process to produce finished positive prints from the exposed negatives in under a minute. The camera was named Polaroid Land Camera Model 95 due to its $95 suggested price, and it was the first of Edwin Land's instant picture cameras.

Although Edwin Land is rightly credited with inventing the Polaroid Camera, it was his daughter who conceived of the idea. While on vacation at the Grand Canyon in 1943, she wondered why developing photos took so long and asked to see the vacation photos right away. Her idea preyed on Land's mind and he started working on the concept that the whole photographic process from taking the image to seeing the finished product shouldn't last longer than 60 seconds.

Polaroid originally manufactured sixty units of this first camera. Fifty-seven were put up for sale at Boston's Jordan Marsh department store before the 1948 Christmas holiday. Polaroid marketers incorrectly guessed that the camera and film would remain in stock long enough to manufacture a second run based on customer demand. All fifty-seven cameras and all of the film were sold on the first day of demonstrations. Starting in 1948 the Polaroid Corporation in Rochester made at least 1.5 million of the Model 95 folding viewfinder camera for his instant roll film, including the variants 95, 95A and 95B.

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Monday, February 20, 2017 / Labels: , ,

"Meaningful Photos": An exercise to enhance meaning in life



February 20, 2017 /Photography News


Difficulty: Moderate | Frequency: 1/Day | Duration: 15 Mins


Why you should try it

Research suggests that finding greater meaning in life helps people cope with stress and improves their overall health and well-being—it’s what makes life feel worth living. But finding meaning in life can sometimes feel like an elusive task. In our day-to-day lives, it can be easy to lose sight of the big picture—we tend to focus more on the mundane than the deeply meaningful.

Yet research suggests that there are potential sources of meaning all around us, from the moments of connection we share with others, to the beauty of nature, to the work that we do and the things we create. This exercise helps you bring these meaningful things into focus—literally. By having you photograph, then write about, things that are meaningful to you, it encourages you to pay closer attention to the varied sources of meaning in your life, large and small, and reflect on why they are important to you.

Time required

15 minutes per day for one week to take the photos. One hour to do the writing exercise. While it is not necessary to take a photograph every day, assume that the photography will take you a total of 90 minutes over the course of a week, with an additional hour for the writing.


How to do it

1. Over the next week, take photographs of things that make your life feel meaningful or full of purpose. These can be people, places, objects, pets. If you are not able to take photos of these things—like if they’re not nearby—you can take photos of souvenirs, reminders, websites, or even other photos. Try to take at least nine photographs.
2. At the end of the week: If you used a digital camera, upload your photos to a computer. If you used a non-digital camera, have your photos developed.
3. Then, once you have collected all of your photos and items, take time to look at and reflect on each one. For each photo or item, write down a response to the following question: “What does this photo represent, and why is it meaningful?"

Evidence that it works

Steger, M. F, Shim, Y., Barenz, J., & Shin, J. Y. (2013). Through the windows of the soul: A pilot study using photography to enhance meaning in life. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 3, 27-30.

College students were instructed to take 9-12 photographs of things that they felt made their life meaningful; one week later, they viewed and wrote about each photograph. They completed a battery of questionnaires before and after this exercise. Afterward, they reported feeling like they had more meaning in their lives, greater life satisfaction, and more positive emotion than they had beforehand.

Why it works

Taking time to recognize and appreciate sources of meaning through photography can help make them more tangible and serve as a reminder of what matters most to you. This greater sense of meaning can, in turn, inspire us to pursue important personal goals and give us a sense of strength and purpose when coping with stressful life events. The use of photography might also benefit people who are more visual than verbal—something for therapists, parents, or teachers to keep in mind as they approach conversations about meaning, purpose, and values in life.

Sources

Michael Steger, Ph.D., Colorado State University

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Tuesday, February 14, 2017 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Valentine Love From the Early 20th Century

February 14, 2017 /Photography News/ Here is a collection of photographs from the beginning of the 20th century. Happy Valentine's Day!

Zulu couple, 1903. (via Okinawa Soba)
Zulu couple, 1903. (via Okinawa Soba)
Young couple chalking hearts onto a tree. Valentine's Day, 1944. The Galt Museum & Archives
Young couple chalking hearts onto a tree. Valentine's Day, 1944. The Galt Museum & Archives
The kiss
The kiss
Young couple seated in garden, circa 1900. Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, Powerhouse Museum. Gift of the Estate of Raymond W Phillips, 2008.
Young couple seated in garden, circa 1900. Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, Powerhouse Museum. Gift of the Estate of Raymond W Phillips, 2008.


Margaret Ballardini & Fred Watson, Luna Park, St Kilda, Victoria, ca. 1927. Photographed by M D True, Electric Studio.
Margaret Ballardini & Fred Watson, Luna Park, St Kilda, Victoria, ca. 1927. Photographed by M D True, Electric Studio.

Soldier's goodbye & Bobbie the cat, ca. 1939-ca. 1945 / by Sam Hood. The State Library of New South Wales.
Soldier's goodbye & Bobbie the cat, ca. 1939-ca. 1945 / by Sam Hood. The State Library of New South Wales.
Sydney, NSW. 1919. A wounded AIF soldier receives an affectionate welcome home at the Anzac Buffet in The Domain. This photograph is from the Australian War Memorial's collection.
Sydney, NSW. 1919. A wounded AIF soldier receives an affectionate welcome home at the Anzac Buffet in The Domain. This photograph is from the Australian War Memorial's collection.


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Sunday, February 12, 2017 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Remembering French Photographer Eugène Atget

February 12, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 160 years ago today, on February 12, 1857, in Libourne near Bordeaux and raised by his uncle, Eugène Atget’s youth was molded by his time as a sailor. Upon his return from the sea, Atget turned to the stage and pursued an acting career. After minor success as an actor, Atget abandoned the stage and at the age of forty took up painting, then quickly turned to his true life’s work as a photographer. For the next thirty years, until just a few short months before his death in 1927, Atget undertook a systematic documentation of the city of Paris, creating approximately five thousand negatives and nearly ten thousand prints.

Because he refused to work with the latest advances in photographic technology, Atget’s images evoke a sense of timelessness, due in part to the slower exposure times and the pre-visualization of the final image that was required. Atget produced glass plate negatives, using an 18 x 24 cm. view camera that was fitted with a brass rectilinear lens and had no shutter. Rather, Atget would simply remove the cap from the lens and capture the scene before him, allowing any motion to appear as a blur. Atget carried this large camera around Paris as he worked to document its essential elements: streets, shop windows, building facades, architectural details, and the landscape of the public gardens and parks in and around the city.

Atget’s unique documentation of the French capital captured the eye of surrealist photographer Man Ray who worked to promote Atget as one of the pre-eminent photographic modernists. Later, the efforts of Berenice Abbott, who acquired Atget’s negatives and prints after his death, finally situated Atget’s work in the history of photography where it continues to gain in stature and influence.

George Eastman House holds approximately 500 prints by Eugène Atget.

Marchard d'abat-jour, rue Lepic. 1899-1900
Marchard d'abat-jour, rue Lepic. 1899-1900

Au Port Salut - Cabaret Rue des Fosses St. Jacques (5e). 1903
Au Port Salut - Cabaret Rue des Fosses St. Jacques (5e). 1903

Brocanteur 38 rue Descartes (5e arr). 1909
Brocanteur 38 rue Descartes (5e arr). 1909

Porte d’Italie. - zone des fortifications - va disparaitre (chiffonniers) (18e arr). 1913
Porte d’Italie. - zone des fortifications - va disparaitre (chiffonniers) (18e arr). 1913
Au Tambour, 63 quai de la Tournelle (5e arr). 1908
Au Tambour, 63 quai de la Tournelle (5e arr). 1908

Cour de Rouen - passage du Commerce (6e ar). 1908
Cour de Rouen - passage du Commerce (6e ar). 1908

Courtesy of the George Eastman House



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Remembering Abraham Lincoln, the most photographed man of his day

February 12, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 208 years ago today, on February 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln lived in the era when photography was introduced to the world and then became a mass communication tool. Lincoln was the first U.S. presidential candidate to tap the new technology frequently and has been called the most photographed man of his day. 

The 204th anniversary of his birth offers a fitting occasion to enjoy treasured portraits from the Library of Congress collections. 

Abraham Lincoln, U.S. President. Seated portrait, facing right. Berger, Anthony, b. 1832, photographer. Washington, D.C. : 1864 Feb. 9. An image from this sitting was the basis for the engraved portrait on the five dollar bill.Published in Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 176. Title devised by Library staff. Gift, Louis Rabinowitz, 1952. Forms part of Civil War glass negative collection (Library of Congress).
Abraham Lincoln, U.S. President. Seated portrait, facing right. Berger, Anthony, b. 1832, photographer. Washington, D.C. : 1864 Feb. 9. An image from this sitting was the basis for the engraved portrait on the five dollar bill.Published in Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 176.
Title devised by Library staff.
Gift, Louis Rabinowitz, 1952.
Forms part of Civil War glass negative collection (Library of Congress).
Lincoln & his secretaries, Nicolay & Hay. Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer. Washington, D.C., 1863, ©1884. Photo shows President Abraham Lincoln seated between his private secretaries John G. Nicolay and John Hay at a photo session in Alexander Gardner's studio in Washington, D.C., on November 8, 1863."On this day John Hay wrote in his diary: 'Went with Mrs. Ames to Gardner's Gallery & were soon joined by Nico (John G. Nicolay) and the Prest. We had a great many pictures taken ... some of the Prest. the best I have seen. ... Nico & I immortalized ourselves by having ourselves done in a group with the Prest." (Source: Ostendorf, p. 142) Published in: Lincoln's photographs : a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, Ohio : Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 142. Title from item. Copyright 1884 March 20, by Dennis Williams, Springfield, Ill.
Lincoln & his secretaries, Nicolay & Hay. Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer. Washington, D.C., 1863, ©1884. Photo shows President Abraham Lincoln seated between his private secretaries John G. Nicolay and John Hay at a photo session in Alexander Gardner's studio in Washington, D.C., on November 8, 1863."On this day John Hay wrote in his diary: 'Went with Mrs. Ames to Gardner's Gallery & were soon joined by Nico (John G. Nicolay) and the Prest. We had a great many pictures taken ... some of the Prest. the best I have seen. ... Nico & I immortalized ourselves by having ourselves done in a group with the Prest." (Source: Ostendorf, p. 142)
Published in: Lincoln's photographs : a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, Ohio : Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 142.
Title from item.
Copyright 1884 March 20, by Dennis Williams, Springfield, Ill.

Inauguration of Mr. Lincoln, March 4, 1861. Washington, D.C., 1861. Photograph shows participants and crowd at the first inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, at the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. Lincoln is standing under the wood canopy, at the front, midway between the left and center posts. His face is in shadow but the white shirt front is visible. (Source: Ostendorf, p. 87)"A distant photograph from a special platform by an unknown photographer, in front of the Capitol, Washington, D.C., afternoon of March 4, 1861. 'A small camera was directly in front of Mr. Lincoln,' reported a newspaper, 'another at a distance of a hundred yards, and a third of huge dimensions on the right ... The three photographers present had plenty of time to take pictures, yet only the distant views have survived." (Source: Ostendorf, p. 86-87) Published in: Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 86-87. Title from item. In album: Benjamin Brown French "Photographs," p. 59.
Inauguration of Mr. Lincoln, March 4, 1861. Washington, D.C., 1861. Photograph shows participants and crowd at the first inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, at the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. Lincoln is standing under the wood canopy, at the front, midway between the left and center posts. His face is in shadow but the white shirt front is visible. (Source: Ostendorf, p. 87)"A distant photograph from a special platform by an unknown photographer, in front of the Capitol, Washington, D.C., afternoon of March 4, 1861. 'A small camera was directly in front of Mr. Lincoln,' reported a newspaper, 'another at a distance of a hundred yards, and a third of huge dimensions on the right ... The three photographers present had plenty of time to take pictures, yet only the distant views have survived." (Source: Ostendorf, p. 86-87)
Published in: Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 86-87.
Title from item.
In album: Benjamin Brown French "Photographs," p. 59.

Abraham Lincoln, candidate for U.S. president. Half-length portrait, seated, facing front. Butler, Preston, photographer. Springfield, Ill., 1860 Aug. 13. Thought to be the last beardless portrait of Lincoln, this photo was "made for the portrait painter, John Henry Brown, noted for his miniatures in ivory. ... 'There are so many hard lines in his face,' wrote Brown in his diary, 'that it becomes a mask to the inner man. His true character only shines out when in an animated conversation, or when telling an amusing tale. ... He is said to be a homely man; I do not think so.'" (Source: Ostendorf, p. 62)Published in: Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 62-63. Title devised by Library staff. Gift; A. Conger Goodyear; 1965.
Abraham Lincoln, candidate for U.S. president. Half-length portrait, seated, facing front. Butler, Preston, photographer. Springfield, Ill., 1860 Aug. 13. Thought to be the last beardless portrait of Lincoln, this photo was "made for the portrait painter, John Henry Brown, noted for his miniatures in ivory. ... 'There are so many hard lines in his face,' wrote Brown in his diary, 'that it becomes a mask to the inner man. His true character only shines out when in an animated conversation, or when telling an amusing tale. ... He is said to be a homely man; I do not think so.'" (Source: Ostendorf, p. 62)Published in: Lincoln's photographs: a complete album / by Lloyd Ostendorf. Dayton, OH: Rockywood Press, 1998, p. 62-63.
Title devised by Library staff.
Gift; A. Conger Goodyear; 1965.
Lincoln's funeral on Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. : 1865 April 19. Photo shows crowd gathered along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., on April 19, 1865, for the procession of President Abraham Lincoln's hearse from the funeral held at the White House to the U.S. Capitol, where his body lay in state before traveling by train to Springfield, Illinois, for burial.Title and date from information on negative sleeve and Library staff. Forms part of Brady-Handy Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).
Lincoln's funeral on Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. : 1865 April 19. Photo shows crowd gathered along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., on April 19, 1865, for the procession of President Abraham Lincoln's hearse from the funeral held at the White House to the U.S. Capitol, where his body lay in state before traveling by train to Springfield, Illinois, for burial.Title and date from information on negative sleeve and Library staff.
Forms part of Brady-Handy Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).

Courtesy of the Library of Congress
 



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Saturday, February 11, 2017 / Labels: , ,

William Henry Fox Talbot and the invention of photography (in photos)

William Henry Fox Talbot, by John Moffat, 1864
William Henry Fox Talbot, by John Moffat, 1864

February 11, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 217 years ago today, Henry Fox Talbot was British inventor and photography pioneer who invented the calotype process, a precursor to photographic processes of the 19th and 20th centuries. Talbot was also a noted photographer who made major contributions to the development of photography as an artistic medium. Talbot conceived and brought about a wholly new way of making pictures, perfected the optical and chemical aspects of photography, and learned to use the new medium to make complex images for the botanist, historian, traveler, and artist. His work in the 1840s on photo-mechanical reproduction led to the creation of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. 

In 1833, while visiting Lake Como in Italy, his lack of success at sketching the scenery prompted him to dream up a new machine with light-sensitive paper that would make the sketches for him automatically. On his return to England, he began work on this project at his home at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire.

"Photoglyptic Gravure", cca. 1860
"Photoglyptic Gravure", cca. 1860
Thomas Wedgwood had already made photograms - silhouettes of leaves and other objects - but these faded quickly. In 1827, Joseph Nicéphore de Niepce had produced pictures on bitumen, and in January 1839, Louis Daguerre displayed his 'Daguerreotypes' - pictures on silver plates - to the French Academy of Sciences. Three weeks later, Fox Talbot reported his 'art of photogenic drawing' to the Royal Society. His process based the prints on paper that had been made light sensitive, rather than bitumen or copper-paper.

Window in the South Gallery of Lacock Abbey made from the oldest photographic negative in existence, August  1835
Window in the South Gallery of Lacock Abbey made from the oldest photographic negative in existence, August  1835
Fox Talbot went on to develop the three primary elements of photography: developing, fixing, and printing. Although simply exposing photographic paper to the light produced an image, it required extremely long exposure times. By accident, he discovered that there was an image after a very short exposure. Although he could not see it, he found he could chemically develop it into a useful negative. The image on this negative was then fixed with a chemical solution. This removed the light-sensitive silver and enabled the picture to be viewed in bright light. With the negative image, Fox Talbot realised he could repeat the process of printing from the negative. Consequently, his process could make any number of positive prints, unlike the Daguerreotypes. He called this the 'calotype' and patented the process in 1841. The following year was rewarded with a medal from the Royal Society for his work.

Miss Horatia Feilding, half sister of W. H. F. Talbot."Calotype", cca. 1842
Miss Horatia Feilding, half sister of W. H. F. Talbot."Calotype", cca. 1842
Talbot spent the last 25 years of his life developing and perfecting an effective photogravure process. His early photogenic drawings are so ephemeral that, despite their exceptional beauty, they can never be exhibited or exposed to light without risk of change. Even his far more stable calotypes fixed with hypo were inconsistent in their permanence, many deteriorating in quick order; a reviewer of the 1862 International Exhibition described some photographs as "fading before the eyes of the nations assembled." Thus, Talbot's search for a photographic process using permanent printer's ink was a final step in the refinement of his earlier, still imperfect, invention.

Fox Talbot was also an eminent mathematician, an astronomer and archaeologist, who translated the cuneiform inscriptions from Nineveh. He died on 11 September 1877.

London Street, Reading. East side, c. 1845. No. 33 (Reading Literary, Scientific and Mechanics' Institution); No. 39 (Lovejoy's Library, bookseller, circulating library, post office, and stationer's); No. 41 (with poster for Reading Races); No. 43 (The Eagle Tavern). A horse and cart waits outside the inn. 1840-1849 : photograph by W. H. Fox Talbot. The original is in the Science Museum/Science and Society Picture Library.
London Street, Reading. East side, c. 1845. No. 33 (Reading Literary, Scientific and Mechanics' Institution); No. 39 (Lovejoy's Library, bookseller, circulating library, post office, and stationer's); No. 41 (with poster for Reading Races); No. 43 (The Eagle Tavern). A horse and cart waits outside the inn. 1840-1849 : photograph by W. H. Fox Talbot. The original is in the Science Museum/Science and Society Picture Library.

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Thursday, February 9, 2017 / Labels: , ,

Remembering snowflake photographer Wilson Bentley

February 9, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 152 years ago, on 9 February 1865, Wilson Bentley was one of the first known photographers of snowflakes. He perfected a process of catching flakes on black velvet in such a way that their images could be captured before they either melted or sublimed.

Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the snowflakes. More than five thousand of his snowflake photomicrographs supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. 

Bentley also photographed all forms of ice and natural water formations including clouds and fog. He was the first American to record raindrop sizes and was one of the first cloud physicists.

He died of pneumonia on December 23, 1931, after walking six miles in a blizzard so he could photograph more snowflakes.

Snowflake photos by Wilson Bentley, circa 1902
Snowflake photos by Wilson Bentley, circa 1902



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Wednesday, February 8, 2017 / Labels: ,

Remembering Julius Neubronner, inventor of pigeon camera

February 8, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 165 years ago, on 8 February 1852, Julius Neubronner was a German apothecary, inventor, company founder, and a pioneer of amateur photography and film, best known for inventing the pigeon camera for aerial photography. The invention brought him international notability, the method being used for military air surveillance in the First World War and later.

Julius Neubronner with pigeon and camera, 1914
Julius Neubronner with pigeon and camera, 1914




Julius Neubronner's patented Pigeon camera with two lenses, with cuirass and harness
Julius Neubronner's patented Pigeon camera with two lenses, with cuirass and harness
Sectional view and pneumatic system of Julius Neubronner's patented pigeon camera with two lenses
Sectional view and pneumatic system of Julius Neubronner's patented pigeon camera with two lenses

Detailed sketches of breast-mounted carrier pigeon camera with two lenses
Detailed sketches of breast-mounted carrier pigeon camera with two lenses


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Saturday, January 28, 2017 / Labels: ,

In photos: Remembering jazz photographer William P. Gottlieb

January 28, 2017 /Photography News/ Born 100 years ago today, on 28 January 1917, William Paul Gottlieb was both a notable jazz journalist and a self-taught photographer who captured the personalities of jazz musicians and told their stories with his camera and typewriter. His images document the jazz scene in New York City and Washington, D.C., from 1938 to 1948, a time recognized by many as the "Golden Age of Jazz". Gottlieb's portraits depict such prominent musicians and personalities as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, and many more.

Gottlieb died of complications from a stroke on April 23, 2006.

In line with Gottlieb's wishes, his photographs were put into the public domain in 2010.

Portrait of Louis Armstrong, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Louis Armstrong, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)

Portrait of Cab Calloway, Columbia studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Cab Calloway, Columbia studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Sonny Greer, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Sonny Greer, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt (Milton) Jackson, and Timmie Rosenkrantz, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. Caption from Down Beat: An impressive photo of a truly impressive singer Ella Fitzgerald at the Downbeat, with Dizzy Gillespie making like a faun in the background. Dizzy has gone on his own way, while Ella is still keeping the club on the beat. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Ella keeps it on the beat," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 20 (Sept. 24, 1947), p. 5.
Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt (Milton) Jackson, and Timmie Rosenkrantz, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: An impressive photo of a truly impressive singer Ella Fitzgerald at the Downbeat, with Dizzy Gillespie making like a faun in the background. Dizzy has gone on his own way, while Ella is still keeping the club on the beat. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Ella keeps it on the beat," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 20 (Sept. 24, 1947), p. 5.

Portrait of Larry Adler and Paul Draper, City Center, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Larry Adler and Paul Draper, City Center, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Duke Ellington, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946. Caption from Down Beat: Fifth in the series of staff lensman Bill Gottlieb's intimate dressing room shots of musical celebrities is Duke Ellington, with the mirror reflecting his always present piano, his conservative ties, his 20 suits, his 15 shirts, his suede shoes and his smiling self. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Through the looking glass," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 20 (Sept. 23, 1946), p. 16.
Portrait of Duke Ellington, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946.
Caption from Down Beat: Fifth in the series of staff lensman Bill Gottlieb's intimate dressing room shots of musical celebrities is Duke Ellington, with the mirror reflecting his always present piano, his conservative ties, his 20 suits, his 15 shirts, his suede shoes and his smiling self. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Through the looking glass," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 20 (Sept. 23, 1946), p. 16.

Portrait of Dardanelle, Washington, D.C., between 1938 and 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Dardanelle, Washington, D.C., between 1938 and 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Cab Calloway, New York, N.Y.(?), ca. Jan. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "The carnation kid," Down Beat, v. 16, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Cab Calloway, New York, N.Y.(?), ca. Jan. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "The carnation kid," Down Beat, v. 16, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1947), p. 16.

Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Freddie Moore, and Lloyd Phillips, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: The Record Changer, v. 6, no. 4 (June 47, 1947), p. 9.
Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Freddie Moore, and Lloyd Phillips, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: The Record Changer, v. 6, no. 4 (June 47, 1947), p. 9.

Portrait of Ralph Burns, Edwin A. Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter, Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. Caption from Down Beat: Taking six arrangers of the modern school to the Museum of Art to pose with pieces by Picasso and Henry Moore seemed like a great idea to staff lensman Bill Gottlieb. Ralph Burns, Eddie Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter obliged, then the trouble started. For details, read the story by Gottlieb on page 2. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Arrangers on the cover," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 7 (Mar. 26, 1947).
Portrait of Ralph Burns, Edwin A. Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter, Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: Taking six arrangers of the modern school to the Museum of Art to pose with pieces by Picasso and Henry Moore seemed like a great idea to staff lensman Bill Gottlieb. Ralph Burns, Eddie Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter obliged, then the trouble started. For details, read the story by Gottlieb on page 2. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Arrangers on the cover," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 7 (Mar. 26, 1947).

Portrait of Dardanelle and Joe Sinacore, Hickory House, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1947. Caption from Down Beat: A hot summer season is promised for New Yorkers, especially those around 52nd Street. Remember the report from the front last January that "Jazz Blows Final Breath?" Eddie Heywood, recently at the Downbeat club, is in the first picture. Coleman Hawkins, working at the Three Deuces, is shown in the second. Dardanelle, vibe star and  leader of her own unit, can be seen at piano, framed by bass and guitar. The last show shows tenorist Bud Freeman at Jimmy Ryan's. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "More who manage to keep New York's swing lane lively," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 16 (July 30, 1947), p. 3.
Portrait of Dardanelle and Joe Sinacore, Hickory House, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: A hot summer season is promised for New Yorkers, especially those around 52nd Street. Remember the report from the front last January that "Jazz Blows Final Breath?" Eddie Heywood, recently at the Downbeat club, is in the first picture. Coleman Hawkins, working at the Three Deuces, is shown in the second. Dardanelle, vibe star and leader of her own unit, can be seen at piano, framed by bass and guitar. The last show shows tenorist Bud Freeman at Jimmy Ryan's. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "More who manage to keep New York's swing lane lively," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 16 (July 30, 1947), p. 3.

Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Billie Holiday, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Feb. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: The Record Changer, v. 5, no. 12 (Feb. 47, 1947), p. 7.
Portrait of Billie Holiday, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Feb. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: The Record Changer, v. 5, no. 12 (Feb. 47, 1947), p. 7.

Portrait of Jerry Jerome, ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Jerome's versatility keeps him busy," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 12 (June 4, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Jerry Jerome, ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Jerome's versatility keeps him busy," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 12 (June 4, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Willie Smith in his apartment, Manhattan, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Willie Smith in his apartment, Manhattan, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Charlie Barnet and Re-Bop, New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1946. Caption from Down Beat: Charlie Barnet's pet monkey, Re-Bop, pretends that he doesn't find much harmony in the sax tootlings of his maestro on the cover of this issue. But it's all in fun, and the grimaces of the monkey are not the reason that Charlie is breaking up his dance band early this month. He's going out to California to rest for the remainder of the summer, probably will re-organize on the west coast this fall. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Charlie, Re-Bop on the cover," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 17 (Aug. 12, 1946).
Portrait of Charlie Barnet and Re-Bop, New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1946.
Caption from Down Beat: Charlie Barnet's pet monkey, Re-Bop, pretends that he doesn't find much harmony in the sax tootlings of his maestro on the cover of this issue. But it's all in fun, and the grimaces of the monkey are not the reason that Charlie is breaking up his dance band early this month. He's going out to California to rest for the remainder of the summer, probably will re-organize on the west coast this fall. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Charlie, Re-Bop on the cover," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 17 (Aug. 12, 1946).

Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Stan Kenton and Bob Gioga, 1947 or 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Stan Kenton and Bob Gioga, 1947 or 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).


 

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