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Thursday, February 11, 2016 / Labels: , ,

"Meaningful Photos": An exercise to enhance meaning in life



February 11, 2016 /Photography News


Difficulty: Moderate | Frequency: 1/Day | Duration: 15 Mins


Why you should try it

Research suggests that finding greater meaning in life helps people cope with stress and improves their overall health and well-being—it’s what makes life feel worth living. But finding meaning in life can sometimes feel like an elusive task. In our day-to-day lives, it can be easy to lose sight of the big picture—we tend to focus more on the mundane than the deeply meaningful.

Yet research suggests that there are potential sources of meaning all around us, from the moments of connection we share with others, to the beauty of nature, to the work that we do and the things we create. This exercise helps you bring these meaningful things into focus—literally. By having you photograph, then write about, things that are meaningful to you, it encourages you to pay closer attention to the varied sources of meaning in your life, large and small, and reflect on why they are important to you.

Time required

15 minutes per day for one week to take the photos. One hour to do the writing exercise. While it is not necessary to take a photograph every day, assume that the photography will take you a total of 90 minutes over the course of a week, with an additional hour for the writing.


How to do it

1. Over the next week, take photographs of things that make your life feel meaningful or full of purpose. These can be people, places, objects, pets. If you are not able to take photos of these things—like if they’re not nearby—you can take photos of souvenirs, reminders, websites, or even other photos. Try to take at least nine photographs.
2. At the end of the week: If you used a digital camera, upload your photos to a computer. If you used a non-digital camera, have your photos developed.
3. Then, once you have collected all of your photos and items, take time to look at and reflect on each one. For each photo or item, write down a response to the following question: “What does this photo represent, and why is it meaningful?"

Evidence that it works

Steger, M. F, Shim, Y., Barenz, J., & Shin, J. Y. (2013). Through the windows of the soul: A pilot study using photography to enhance meaning in life. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 3, 27-30.

College students were instructed to take 9-12 photographs of things that they felt made their life meaningful; one week later, they viewed and wrote about each photograph. They completed a battery of questionnaires before and after this exercise. Afterward, they reported feeling like they had more meaning in their lives, greater life satisfaction, and more positive emotion than they had beforehand.

Why it works

Taking time to recognize and appreciate sources of meaning through photography can help make them more tangible and serve as a reminder of what matters most to you. This greater sense of meaning can, in turn, inspire us to pursue important personal goals and give us a sense of strength and purpose when coping with stressful life events. The use of photography might also benefit people who are more visual than verbal—something for therapists, parents, or teachers to keep in mind as they approach conversations about meaning, purpose, and values in life.

Sources

Michael Steger, Ph.D., Colorado State University

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William Henry Fox Talbot and the invention of photography (in photos)

William Henry Fox Talbot, by John Moffat, 1864
William Henry Fox Talbot, by John Moffat, 1864

February 11, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 216 years ago today, Henry Fox Talbot was British inventor and photography pioneer who invented the calotype process, a precursor to photographic processes of the 19th and 20th centuries. Talbot was also a noted photographer who made major contributions to the development of photography as an artistic medium. Talbot conceived and brought about a wholly new way of making pictures, perfected the optical and chemical aspects of photography, and learned to use the new medium to make complex images for the botanist, historian, traveler, and artist. His work in the 1840s on photo-mechanical reproduction led to the creation of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. 

In 1833, while visiting Lake Como in Italy, his lack of success at sketching the scenery prompted him to dream up a new machine with light-sensitive paper that would make the sketches for him automatically. On his return to England, he began work on this project at his home at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire.

"Photoglyptic Gravure", cca. 1860
"Photoglyptic Gravure", cca. 1860
Thomas Wedgwood had already made photograms - silhouettes of leaves and other objects - but these faded quickly. In 1827, Joseph Nic├ęphore de Niepce had produced pictures on bitumen, and in January 1839, Louis Daguerre displayed his 'Daguerreotypes' - pictures on silver plates - to the French Academy of Sciences. Three weeks later, Fox Talbot reported his 'art of photogenic drawing' to the Royal Society. His process based the prints on paper that had been made light sensitive, rather than bitumen or copper-paper.

Window in the South Gallery of Lacock Abbey made from the oldest photographic negative in existence, August  1835
Window in the South Gallery of Lacock Abbey made from the oldest photographic negative in existence, August  1835
Fox Talbot went on to develop the three primary elements of photography: developing, fixing, and printing. Although simply exposing photographic paper to the light produced an image, it required extremely long exposure times. By accident, he discovered that there was an image after a very short exposure. Although he could not see it, he found he could chemically develop it into a useful negative. The image on this negative was then fixed with a chemical solution. This removed the light-sensitive silver and enabled the picture to be viewed in bright light. With the negative image, Fox Talbot realised he could repeat the process of printing from the negative. Consequently, his process could make any number of positive prints, unlike the Daguerreotypes. He called this the 'calotype' and patented the process in 1841. The following year was rewarded with a medal from the Royal Society for his work.

Miss Horatia Feilding, half sister of W. H. F. Talbot."Calotype", cca. 1842
Miss Horatia Feilding, half sister of W. H. F. Talbot."Calotype", cca. 1842
Talbot spent the last 25 years of his life developing and perfecting an effective photogravure process. His early photogenic drawings are so ephemeral that, despite their exceptional beauty, they can never be exhibited or exposed to light without risk of change. Even his far more stable calotypes fixed with hypo were inconsistent in their permanence, many deteriorating in quick order; a reviewer of the 1862 International Exhibition described some photographs as "fading before the eyes of the nations assembled." Thus, Talbot's search for a photographic process using permanent printer's ink was a final step in the refinement of his earlier, still imperfect, invention.

Fox Talbot was also an eminent mathematician, an astronomer and archaeologist, who translated the cuneiform inscriptions from Nineveh. He died on 11 September 1877.

London Street, Reading. East side, c. 1845. No. 33 (Reading Literary, Scientific and Mechanics' Institution); No. 39 (Lovejoy's Library, bookseller, circulating library, post office, and stationer's); No. 41 (with poster for Reading Races); No. 43 (The Eagle Tavern). A horse and cart waits outside the inn. 1840-1849 : photograph by W. H. Fox Talbot. The original is in the Science Museum/Science and Society Picture Library.
London Street, Reading. East side, c. 1845. No. 33 (Reading Literary, Scientific and Mechanics' Institution); No. 39 (Lovejoy's Library, bookseller, circulating library, post office, and stationer's); No. 41 (with poster for Reading Races); No. 43 (The Eagle Tavern). A horse and cart waits outside the inn. 1840-1849 : photograph by W. H. Fox Talbot. The original is in the Science Museum/Science and Society Picture Library.

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016 / Labels: , ,

Remembering snowflake photographer Wilson Bentley

February 9, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 151 years ago, on 9 February 1865, Wilson Bentley was one of the first known photographers of snowflakes. He perfected a process of catching flakes on black velvet in such a way that their images could be captured before they either melted or sublimed.

Bentley first became fascinated with snow during his childhood on a Vermont farm, and he experimented for years with ways to view individual snowflakes in order to study their crystalline structure. He eventually attached a camera to his microscope, and in 1885 he successfully photographed the snowflakes. More than five thousand of his snowflake photomicrographs supported the belief that no two snowflakes are alike, leading scientists to study his work and publish it in numerous scientific articles and magazines. 

Bentley also photographed all forms of ice and natural water formations including clouds and fog. He was the first American to record raindrop sizes and was one of the first cloud physicists.

He died of pneumonia on December 23, 1931, after walking six miles in a blizzard so he could photograph more snowflakes.

Snowflake photos by Wilson Bentley, circa 1902
Snowflake photos by Wilson Bentley, circa 1902



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Monday, February 8, 2016 / Labels: ,

Remembering Julius Neubronner, inventor of pigeon camera

February 8, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 164 years ago, on 8 February 1852, Julius Neubronner was a German apothecary, inventor, company founder, and a pioneer of amateur photography and film, best known for inventing the pigeon camera for aerial photography. The invention brought him international notability, the method being used for military air surveillance in the First World War and later.

Julius Neubronner with pigeon and camera, 1914
Julius Neubronner with pigeon and camera, 1914




Julius Neubronner's patented Pigeon camera with two lenses, with cuirass and harness
Julius Neubronner's patented Pigeon camera with two lenses, with cuirass and harness
Sectional view and pneumatic system of Julius Neubronner's patented pigeon camera with two lenses
Sectional view and pneumatic system of Julius Neubronner's patented pigeon camera with two lenses

Detailed sketches of breast-mounted carrier pigeon camera with two lenses
Detailed sketches of breast-mounted carrier pigeon camera with two lenses


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Wednesday, February 3, 2016 / Labels: , ,

Signs of Love 2016 Photography Competition

Photo © Racianu Cosmin
February 3, 2016 /Photography News/ Love is the emotion that binds all of us. Love signifies caring, faithfulness, devotion and hope. Love comes in all shapes and forms. Love can be our feelings for a parent, partner, child or pet. Love can also explain our devotion to our country or nationality. It is an emotion to which we are all drawn. A photograph can capture and display this emotion quite vividly or very subtly. Photographers are invited to submit their own interpretation of this powerful emotion.

Prizes:
  • First Place: $500 (USD) cash prize
  • Second Place: $200 (USD) cash prize
  • Third Place: $100 (USD) cash prize
  • Three (3) Honorable Mentions & three (3) Merit Winners will also be chosen.
  • All finalists will be announced in the TBMPN/WPN newsletter. Finalists will also receive recognition in on line gallery display and social media exposure via Facebook and Twitter.
Copyright:
All submitted images remain sole property of artist/photographer.

Entry Fee(s):
$25 (USD) for first 4 images
(Up to 8 image entries may be submitted for additional fees)
Color and/or Black and White images will be accepted.

Eligibility:
Contest is open to all individuals 18 years and older, worldwide.

Entry Deadline:
March 7, 2016 (11:59PM CST)


To view all current call for entries listed at Photography News, visit http://www.photography-news.com/2009/12/photography-competitions.html

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Thursday, January 28, 2016 / Labels: ,

In photos: Remembering jazz photographer William P. Gottlieb

January 28, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 99 years ago today, on 28 January 1917, William Paul Gottlieb was both a notable jazz journalist and a self-taught photographer who captured the personalities of jazz musicians and told their stories with his camera and typewriter. His images document the jazz scene in New York City and Washington, D.C., from 1938 to 1948, a time recognized by many as the "Golden Age of Jazz". Gottlieb's portraits depict such prominent musicians and personalities as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, and many more.

Gottlieb died of complications from a stroke on April 23, 2006.

In line with Gottlieb's wishes, his photographs were put into the public domain in 2010.

Portrait of Louis Armstrong, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Louis Armstrong, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)

Portrait of Cab Calloway, Columbia studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Cab Calloway, Columbia studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress)
Portrait of Sonny Greer, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Sonny Greer, Aquarium, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt (Milton) Jackson, and Timmie Rosenkrantz, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947. Caption from Down Beat: An impressive photo of a truly impressive singer Ella Fitzgerald at the Downbeat, with Dizzy Gillespie making like a faun in the background. Dizzy has gone on his own way, while Ella is still keeping the club on the beat. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Ella keeps it on the beat," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 20 (Sept. 24, 1947), p. 5.
Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt (Milton) Jackson, and Timmie Rosenkrantz, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: An impressive photo of a truly impressive singer Ella Fitzgerald at the Downbeat, with Dizzy Gillespie making like a faun in the background. Dizzy has gone on his own way, while Ella is still keeping the club on the beat. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Ella keeps it on the beat," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 20 (Sept. 24, 1947), p. 5.

Portrait of Larry Adler and Paul Draper, City Center, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Larry Adler and Paul Draper, City Center, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Duke Ellington, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946. Caption from Down Beat: Fifth in the series of staff lensman Bill Gottlieb's intimate dressing room shots of musical celebrities is Duke Ellington, with the mirror reflecting his always present piano, his conservative ties, his 20 suits, his 15 shirts, his suede shoes and his smiling self. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Through the looking glass," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 20 (Sept. 23, 1946), p. 16.
Portrait of Duke Ellington, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946.
Caption from Down Beat: Fifth in the series of staff lensman Bill Gottlieb's intimate dressing room shots of musical celebrities is Duke Ellington, with the mirror reflecting his always present piano, his conservative ties, his 20 suits, his 15 shirts, his suede shoes and his smiling self. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Through the looking glass," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 20 (Sept. 23, 1946), p. 16.

Portrait of Dardanelle, Washington, D.C., between 1938 and 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Dardanelle, Washington, D.C., between 1938 and 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Cab Calloway, New York, N.Y.(?), ca. Jan. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "The carnation kid," Down Beat, v. 16, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Cab Calloway, New York, N.Y.(?), ca. Jan. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "The carnation kid," Down Beat, v. 16, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1947), p. 16.

Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Freddie Moore, and Lloyd Phillips, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: The Record Changer, v. 6, no. 4 (June 47, 1947), p. 9.
Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Freddie Moore, and Lloyd Phillips, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: The Record Changer, v. 6, no. 4 (June 47, 1947), p. 9.

Portrait of Ralph Burns, Edwin A. Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter, Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947. Caption from Down Beat: Taking six arrangers of the modern school to the Museum of Art to pose with pieces by Picasso and Henry Moore seemed like a great idea to staff lensman Bill Gottlieb. Ralph Burns, Eddie Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter obliged, then the trouble started. For details, read the story by Gottlieb on page 2. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Arrangers on the cover," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 7 (Mar. 26, 1947).
Portrait of Ralph Burns, Edwin A. Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter, Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: Taking six arrangers of the modern school to the Museum of Art to pose with pieces by Picasso and Henry Moore seemed like a great idea to staff lensman Bill Gottlieb. Ralph Burns, Eddie Finckel, George Handy, Neal Hefti, Johnny Richards, and Eddie Sauter obliged, then the trouble started. For details, read the story by Gottlieb on page 2. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Arrangers on the cover," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 7 (Mar. 26, 1947).

Portrait of Dardanelle and Joe Sinacore, Hickory House, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1947. Caption from Down Beat: A hot summer season is promised for New Yorkers, especially those around 52nd Street. Remember the report from the front last January that "Jazz Blows Final Breath?" Eddie Heywood, recently at the Downbeat club, is in the first picture. Coleman Hawkins, working at the Three Deuces, is shown in the second. Dardanelle, vibe star and  leader of her own unit, can be seen at piano, framed by bass and guitar. The last show shows tenorist Bud Freeman at Jimmy Ryan's. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "More who manage to keep New York's swing lane lively," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 16 (July 30, 1947), p. 3.
Portrait of Dardanelle and Joe Sinacore, Hickory House, New York, N.Y., ca. July 1947.
Caption from Down Beat: A hot summer season is promised for New Yorkers, especially those around 52nd Street. Remember the report from the front last January that "Jazz Blows Final Breath?" Eddie Heywood, recently at the Downbeat club, is in the first picture. Coleman Hawkins, working at the Three Deuces, is shown in the second. Dardanelle, vibe star and leader of her own unit, can be seen at piano, framed by bass and guitar. The last show shows tenorist Bud Freeman at Jimmy Ryan's. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "More who manage to keep New York's swing lane lively," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 16 (July 30, 1947), p. 3.

Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Billie Holiday, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Feb. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: The Record Changer, v. 5, no. 12 (Feb. 47, 1947), p. 7.
Portrait of Billie Holiday, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Feb. 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: The Record Changer, v. 5, no. 12 (Feb. 47, 1947), p. 7.

Portrait of Jerry Jerome, ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Jerome's versatility keeps him busy," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 12 (June 4, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Jerry Jerome, ca. June 1947. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Jerome's versatility keeps him busy," Down Beat, v. 14, no. 12 (June 4, 1947), p. 16.
Portrait of Willie Smith in his apartment, Manhattan, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Willie Smith in his apartment, Manhattan, New York, N.Y., ca. Jan. 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Charlie Barnet and Re-Bop, New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1946. Caption from Down Beat: Charlie Barnet's pet monkey, Re-Bop, pretends that he doesn't find much harmony in the sax tootlings of his maestro on the cover of this issue. But it's all in fun, and the grimaces of the monkey are not the reason that Charlie is breaking up his dance band early this month. He's going out to California to rest for the remainder of the summer, probably will re-organize on the west coast this fall. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). In: "Charlie, Re-Bop on the cover," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 17 (Aug. 12, 1946).
Portrait of Charlie Barnet and Re-Bop, New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1946.
Caption from Down Beat: Charlie Barnet's pet monkey, Re-Bop, pretends that he doesn't find much harmony in the sax tootlings of his maestro on the cover of this issue. But it's all in fun, and the grimaces of the monkey are not the reason that Charlie is breaking up his dance band early this month. He's going out to California to rest for the remainder of the summer, probably will re-organize on the west coast this fall. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
In: "Charlie, Re-Bop on the cover," Down Beat, v. 13, no. 17 (Aug. 12, 1946).

Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Sidney Bechet, Jimmy Ryan's (Club), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Portrait of Stan Kenton and Bob Gioga, 1947 or 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).
Portrait of Stan Kenton and Bob Gioga, 1947 or 1948. William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).


 

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Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Labels: ,

Lewis Carroll's haunting photographs of young girls

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Xie Kitchin. 1874
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Xie Kitchin. 1874
January 27, 2016 /Photography News/ Born 184 years ago on 27 January 1832, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer.

From today’s perspective, his most notable career is that of writing, as it cemented his pen name in pop culture: Lewis Carroll. But only acknowledging his literary accomplishments would do him a grave injustice.

In the days when photography was just starting to establish itself as an art form, Dodgson took notice of the extremely precise and mathematical aspects of it. Influenced by his uncle Skeffington Lutwidge and his friend Reginald Southey, he picked up the hobby and - as with just about everything he tried in his life - he excelled almost immediately.

Throughout his 24-year career as a photographer he became a master of the medium, boasting a portfolio of roughly 3,000 images and his very own studio. His subjects were most often people, although he also photographed landscapes, dolls, dogs, statues, paintings, trees and even skeletons, as seen above.

From the 3000+ photographs taken by Dodgson, only 1000 have survived due to the passage of time and deliberate destruction, of which just over half are of children (mostly young girls) - 30 of whom are depicted nude or semi-nude.

Beatrice Hatch, 30 July 1873. Photograph taken by Lewis Carroll, then colored by Anne Lydia Bond on Carroll's instructions
Beatrice Hatch, 30 July 1873. Photograph taken by Lewis Carroll, then colored by Anne Lydia Bond on Carroll's instructions

Evelyn Hatch, 29 July 1879.Photograph taken by Lewis Carroll, then colored by Anne Lydia Bond on Carroll's instructions
Evelyn Hatch, 29 July 1879.Photograph taken by Lewis Carroll, then colored by Anne Lydia Bond on Carroll's instructions

His affection for younger girls, many of whom inspired the stories he wrote, has led many to conclude that Dodgson may very well have been paedophilic in nature, including Morton N. Cohen in his Lewis Carroll: A Biography (1995), Donald Thomas in his Lewis Carroll: A Portrait with Background (1995), and Michael Bakewell in his Lewis Carroll: A Biography (1996).

Most famously, Carroll obsessively photographed the young Alice Liddell, daughter of family friend Henry George Liddell and inspiration for Carroll’s most famous fictional character.

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Alice. 1858
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Alice. 1858

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Alice. 1859
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Alice. 1859

Carroll’s carefully staged child photographs are very much like those of other photographers of the period like Mary Cowden Clarke and Julia Margaret Cameron, who also photographed Alice Liddell, even into her adulthood.

Below are a few more photographs from Lewis Carroll's collection:

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Amy Hughes
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Amy Hughes

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Annie Coates. 1857
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Annie Coates. 1857

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Ella Chlora Faithful Monier-Williams. 1866
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Ella Chlora Faithful Monier-Williams. 1866

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Liddell-Sisters (Alice right). 1858
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Liddell-Sisters (Alice right). 1858

Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Xie Kitchin. 1876
Lewis Carroll. Fine Art Photography. Xie Kitchin. 1876

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Tuesday, January 26, 2016 / Labels: , ,

In photos: Post-1870 Sydney exposed


January 26, 2016 /Photography NewsCelebrated annually on 26 January, Australia Day (previously known as Anniversary Day, Foundation Day, and ANA Day) commemorates the arrival of the First Fleet at Sydney Cove in 1788 and the proclamation at that time of British sovereignty over the eastern seaboard of New Holland.

The collection below is a photographic record of the people, places and events of Sydney after 1870, highlighting the history and changing nature of Sydney, Australia's first and largest metropolis. 


[Weatherboard buildings, Market Street, at the corner of Clarence Street, Sydney], [Dec 1875] / by unknown photographer. Notes: This photograph accompanied a scathing Government report into the city’s sewerage system. Of these dwellings, it said, ‘Any one who may be curious to know how long Colonial timber will last, until, by the combined action of the elements, white ants, and other sources of destruction, it becomes triturated into powder, can satisfy their curiosity by ascertaining the date on which these houses were constructed. The corner house is occupied and used as a butcher's shop; it is a filthy stinking place...’
[Weatherboard buildings, Market Street, at the corner of Clarence Street, Sydney], [Dec 1875] / by unknown photographer. Notes: This photograph accompanied a scathing Government report into the city’s sewerage system. Of these dwellings, it said, ‘Any one who may be curious to know how long Colonial timber will last, until, by the combined action of the elements, white ants, and other sources of destruction, it becomes triturated into powder, can satisfy their curiosity by ascertaining the date on which these houses were constructed. The corner house is occupied and used as a butcher's shop; it is a filthy stinking place...’

The Gap, Sydney, 188- / photographer unknown. Note: Sydney's most notorious suicide spot, the cliff in front of the buildings, right. On 20 September 1857, the Dunbar was trying to enter Sydney Heads at night in a blinding storm and was smashed on the rocks, lower right. Only one survivor was found the next day. The Dunbar was less than a mile from safety after her more than 10,000 mile journey from Britain. Children still marvel to the story as they view the anchor now on display on the clifftop walk.
The Gap, Sydney, 188- / photographer unknown. Note: Sydney's most notorious suicide spot, the cliff in front of the buildings, right. On 20 September 1857, the Dunbar was trying to enter Sydney Heads at night in a blinding storm and was smashed on the rocks, lower right. Only one survivor was found the next day. The Dunbar was less than a mile from safety after her more than 10,000 mile journey from Britain. Children still marvel to the story as they view the anchor now on display on the clifftop walk.

Advertising hoarding for McLean, Rigg from Sydney, ca. 1885-1890 / photographed by Arthur K. Syer.
Advertising hoarding for McLean, Rigg from Sydney, ca. 1885-1890 / photographed by Arthur K. Syer.

King and Elizabeth Street corner from Sydney, 1890 / photographed by Arthur K. Syer.
King and Elizabeth Street corner from Sydney, 1890 / photographed by Arthur K. Syer.

Arrival of Governor Sir Robert Duff, Circular Quay, Sydney, June 1893 / photographer unknown. Note: the sailing ship called the "Convict Hulk Success", a commercial exhibit, upper right, and the bald-faced building with two towers which is a fire station, upper left.
Arrival of Governor Sir Robert Duff, Circular Quay, Sydney, June 1893 / photographer unknown. Note: the sailing ship called the "Convict Hulk Success", a commercial exhibit, upper right, and the bald-faced building with two towers which is a fire station, upper left.

Horsedrawn ambulance outside Civil Ambulance & Transport Brigade headquarters, corner of George & Pitt Sts opposite the Benevolent Asylum, now Central Square, c. 1900, by unknown photographer.
Horsedrawn ambulance outside Civil Ambulance & Transport Brigade headquarters, corner of George & Pitt Sts opposite the Benevolent Asylum, now Central Square, c. 1900, by unknown photographer.

[Pedestrians on George St], ca. 1900, from Frederick Danvers Power : photonegatives, 1898-1926 / Frederick Danvers. Power Notes: Amateur photographer Frederick Danvers Power had a concealed detective camera, which he used to snap these women crossing Martin Place at George Street, with the Post Office behind them. This image gives us a more accurate idea of what women actually wore, than formal studio photographs or magazine illustrations. People wore their best outfit to the portrait studio and parasols and hats, which shaded the face, were not permitted. On the other hand, the idealised renditions of fashion published in magazines show neither creased clothes nor worn shoes.
[Pedestrians on George St], ca. 1900, from Frederick Danvers Power : photonegatives, 1898-1926 / Frederick Danvers. Power Notes: Amateur photographer Frederick Danvers Power had a concealed detective camera, which he used to snap these women crossing Martin Place at George Street, with the Post Office behind them. This image gives us a more accurate idea of what women actually wore, than formal studio photographs or magazine illustrations. People wore their best outfit to the portrait studio and parasols and hats, which shaded the face, were not permitted. On the other hand, the idealised renditions of fashion published in magazines show neither creased clothes nor worn shoes.

Society of Artists' Selection Committee, Sydney, 1907 / photographer Henry King. (l to r) Julian Ashton, Mrs Norman Lindsay, Harry Weston, Will Dyson, Norman Lindsay, young Souter, Sidney Long & D.H. Souter. Norman Lindsay is perhaps the best known of these young bohemian artists having a picnic in their rooms. He is looking pensive, fifth from the left.
Society of Artists' Selection Committee, Sydney, 1907 / photographer Henry King. (l to r) Julian Ashton, Mrs Norman Lindsay, Harry Weston, Will Dyson, Norman Lindsay, young Souter, Sidney Long & D.H. Souter. Norman Lindsay is perhaps the best known of these young bohemian artists having a picnic in their rooms. He is looking pensive, fifth from the left.

Sydney markets, by Rex Hazlewood, c. 1911-1916.
Sydney markets, by Rex Hazlewood, c. 1911-1916.

New gas-masks for the NSW Fire Brigade, Castlereagh Street headquarters, Sydney, 1927 / Sam Hood. Firemen display their latest gasmask at the Fire Brigade's Castlereagh Street headquarters, where popular demonstrations for the public were given on Wednesday afternoons.
New gas-masks for the NSW Fire Brigade, Castlereagh Street headquarters, Sydney, 1927 / Sam Hood. Firemen display their latest gasmask at the Fire Brigade's Castlereagh Street headquarters, where popular demonstrations for the public were given on Wednesday afternoons.

Twenty four pigs being driven along Day Street, Sydney, by a truck, ca. 1929 / Sam Hood. Notes: As odd as it may seem today, Sydney regularly had livestock in its streets. However, this example of a truck driving a herd of pigs along the Day Street waterfront towards Market Street is an anachronism, as the area for penning animals had become the City Council depot and the city livestock markets had moved 20km out of the city to Homebush.
Twenty four pigs being driven along Day Street, Sydney, by a truck, ca. 1929 / Sam Hood. Notes: As odd as it may seem today, Sydney regularly had livestock in its streets. However, this example of a truck driving a herd of pigs along the Day Street waterfront towards Market Street is an anachronism, as the area for penning animals had become the City Council depot and the city livestock markets had moved 20km out of the city to Homebush.

View from pulley-wheels of north side creeper-crane (jibbed right out) looking into box section of south side arch, Sydney Harbour Bridge, May 1930 / Ted Hood (hanging upside down 130 metres - 420 feet - above the Harbour)
View from pulley-wheels of north side creeper-crane (jibbed right out) looking into box section of south side arch, Sydney Harbour Bridge, May 1930 / Ted Hood (hanging upside down 130 metres - 420 feet - above the Harbour)

[Artillery fire the salute at the opening of the Harbour Bridge], 19 March 1932, by Sam Hood
[Artillery fire the salute at the opening of the Harbour Bridge], 19 March 1932, by Sam Hood
Views in Sydney and New South Wales, 1930-40 / by Charles F. Walton. Notes: No title, thought to have been taken 1935 between Kent and High Streets, Sydney.
Views in Sydney and New South Wales, 1930-40 / by Charles F. Walton. Notes: No title, thought to have been taken 1935 between Kent and High Streets, Sydney.

Tram and taxi smash in Pitt Street, 25/6/1937 / Sam Hood. Notes: Trams and their operation were blamed for many accidents in Sydney’s narrow streets. In this case, traffic in Pitt Street was held up when a taxi pulled out from the curb and was struck by one of Sydney’s notorious ‘toast rack’ trams. Pedestrians have added to the confusion, creating a bottleneck. In 1921 regulations were passed which required motorists to signal their intention to stop or turn, but hand signals were not always given or seen.
Tram and taxi smash in Pitt Street, 25/6/1937 / Sam Hood. Notes: Trams and their operation were blamed for many accidents in Sydney’s narrow streets. In this case, traffic in Pitt Street was held up when a taxi pulled out from the curb and was struck by one of Sydney’s notorious ‘toast rack’ trams. Pedestrians have added to the confusion, creating a bottleneck. In 1921 regulations were passed which required motorists to signal their intention to stop or turn, but hand signals were not always given or seen.

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Sunday, January 17, 2016 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Remembering the Terra Nova Expedition

January 17, 2016 /Photography News/ The Terra Nova Expedition (1910–1913), officially the British Antarctic Expedition 1910, was led by Robert Falcon Scott with the objective of being the first to reach the geographical South Pole. Scott and four companions attained the pole 104 years ago today, on 17 January 1912, to find that a Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen had preceded them by 33 days. 

Herbert George Ponting (1870-1935) was the expedition photographer and cinematographer for the Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole. He was one of the first to use a portable movie camera in Antarctica. 

Scott's entire crew died on the return journey from the pole. Some of their bodies, journals, and photographs were discovered by a search party eight months later.

Photos courtesy of the National Library of New Zealand

Herbert George Ponting taking a photo with large camera on tripod during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, January 1912. Taken by unidentified photographer. Silver gelatin print. Photographic Archive, Alexander Turnbull Library.
Herbert George Ponting taking a photo with large camera on tripod during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, January 1912. Taken by unidentified photographer. Silver gelatin print. Photographic Archive, Alexander Turnbull Library.

Grotto in an iceberg, photographed during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1913, 5 Jan 1911. Photographer: Herbert Ponting. Silver gelatin print. Photographic Archive, Alexander Turnbull Library.
Grotto in an iceberg, photographed during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1913, 5 Jan 1911. Photographer: Herbert Ponting. Silver gelatin print. Photographic Archive, Alexander Turnbull Library.

Dog Chris, listening to the gramophone, during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition of 1910-1913. Photograph taken by Herbert Ponting, circa January 1911.
Dog Chris, listening to the gramophone, during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition of 1910-1913. Photograph taken by Herbert Ponting, circa January 1911.
Herbert Ponting showing slides during his lecture on Japan, during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition of 1910-13. Photograph taken by Herbert Ponting on the 16th of October, 1911.
Herbert Ponting showing slides during his lecture on Japan, during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition of 1910-13. Photograph taken by Herbert Ponting on the 16th of October, 1911.

Dr Edward Atkinson in his lab, photographed September 15th, 1911 by Herbert George Ponting during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition (1910-1913). Shows him standing by a table of items, including a microscope, holding a test tube.
Dr Edward Atkinson in his lab, photographed September 15th, 1911 by Herbert George Ponting during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition (1910-1913). Shows him standing by a table of items, including a microscope, holding a test tube.
Thomas Clissold the cook making bread during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1913. Shows him in a kitchen surrounded by equipment and supplies. He wears hat and apron and is kneading dough on a table. Griffiths McAllister & Co containers of bacon rations, beed marrowfat, cod roes, ground cinnamon, celery seed, sago, and washing soda, are visible in the foreground. Photograph taken on the 26th of March 1911 by Herbert George Ponting.
Thomas Clissold the cook making bread during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1913. Shows him in a kitchen surrounded by equipment and supplies. He wears hat and apron and is kneading dough on a table. Griffiths McAllister & Co containers of bacon rations, beed marrowfat, cod roes, ground cinnamon, celery seed, sago, and washing soda, are visible in the foreground. Photograph taken on the 26th of March 1911 by Herbert George Ponting.

Sky effect (midnight sun), penguins at ice-edge. Taken by Herbert George Ponting on 13 January 1911 during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition (1910-1913).
Sky effect (midnight sun), penguins at ice-edge. Taken by Herbert George Ponting on 13 January 1911 during the British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition (1910-1913).

The ship Terra Nova arriving at the Bay of Whales in 1910, to find the Norwegian expedition. (Caption from `The South Pole Ponies' by Theodore K Mason, 1979, page 133). Photographed from `Fram', the ship of Amundsen, by an unidentified photographer.
The ship Terra Nova arriving at the Bay of Whales in 1910, to find the Norwegian expedition. (Caption from `The South Pole Ponies' by Theodore K Mason, 1979, page 133). Photographed from `Fram', the ship of Amundsen, by an unidentified photographer.

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