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Tuesday, April 28, 2015 / Labels: , ,

Abandoned 2015 Photography Competition

Photo: © Josef Kissinger
April 27, 2015 /Photography News/ Abandoned buildings are somewhat strangely appealing to people as they arouse our interests and curiosities. There is something terribly intriguing with these deserted structures and their past histories. PictureCompete invites you to submit your best representations of what “Abandoned” means to you.

Prizes:
• First Place: $250 (USD) Cash Prize
• Second Place: $100 (USD) Cash Prize
• Third Place: $75 (USD) Cash Prize

Finalists will also receive:
• Winner's gallery exhibition
• Social media exposure
• World Photography Network Newsletter exposure

Eligibility:
Open to all individuals 18 years and older, worldwide.

Entry Fee:
$15.00 for up to four (4) images.

Deadline: June 11, 2015

To enter the competition, go to http://picturecompete.com/photo-contests/ 

To view all current call for entries listed at Photography News, visit http://www.photography-news.com/2009/12/photography-competitions.html


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Take Your Professional Photo Printing to New Levels With Exciting Surfaces

Just as painters are free to choose a variety of paint mediums and surfaces to create artwork that conveys their unique style and vision, photographers can choose a variety of printing methods and papers to enhance and customize the presentation of their images.

Professional photo printing blasts open the possibilities by offering a vast array of papers and surfaces than the typical glossy and matte finishes available through typical photofinishers. Some of the variables from which to include are paper thickness and weight; brightness and acid content and archival status. Because some of these options aren’t always readily apparent to look at in a finished product, but surface and finish are more identifiable, here are some of the many fine art papers and surfaces available, organized by surface and texture.

Bright White Matte
  • Epson Hot Bright Press Paper: This is a heavy paper with a bright white base and a hot press, smooth matte finish. It is perfect for high detail color fine art photos or prints that require a varying degree of contrast. This paper also works well for fine art reproductions, black and white photographs, limited edition prints, albums, digital art, greeting cards, or even presentation prints that will be a part of important exhibitions and displays.
  • Hahnemuele Photo Rag 308 Paper: This cotton rag paper has a smooth mat surface on bright white. This is a great choice for archival printing of color photographs, but especially black and white pictures. It is also ideal for limited edition prints, fine art reproductions, greeting cards, digital art, and exhibition presentation prints. It’s acid free, lightfast and extremely resistant to aging.

Glossy or Luster
  • Epson Premium Glossy 250: This resin-coated, high gloss paper produces vivid images, said to rival those of traditional silver halide prints. A favorite for both black and white and color reproduction, the surface is also smudge and water resistant.
  • Moab Slickrock Metallic Pearl 260: This high gloss paper with a unique metallic pearl sheen makes black and white images shine and color images seem to glow from within with an almost 3D-like quality.

Textured
  • Canson Infinity Arches Aquarelle 310 Paper: This heavy weight, natural, warm white tone textured watercolor paper features a distinctive cloud-like mold-made surface. This texture and color lends a subtle look to photographic reproductions and delivers and excellent color gamut, saturation and precise detail.
  • Epson Somerset Velvet Paper: This is a heavy paper on a radiant white surface, with a velvety texture most commonly used for fine art reproduction and stylized artwork. It creates a soft and warm appearance that might best be reserved for photographs with soft, painterly, impressionistic or abstract subjects.

Alternative Surfaces
  • Epson Exhibition Canvas Matte: The fine, textured surface of this poly-cotton canvas can be used for almost any style of photograph. Stretched on a frame, it can be hung in a float frame or presented as a gallery wrap without a frame it has a modern clean look that jumps off of a wall.
  • Plexiglas®: Printing on Plexiglas acrylic gives photographic work a luminosity and bright, crisp clarity. The glossy, vivid color reproduction lends itself to modern or commercial photo products.
  • Aluminum: Depending upon your professional photo printing service provider, prints on aluminum can be applied directly to the silver textured surface, giving images a translucent metallic sheen, or given more traditional reproduction on a white-coated surface that allows for accurate color reproduction. These are perfect for achieving an industrial look.

Find more details on professional photo printing at AmericanFrame.com
Laura Jajko is President of Marketing at AmericanFrame.com, the nation’s leading online source for custom frames, mat board, archival digital printing services and picture framing supplies. For inspiring picture framing and design ideas, visit her blog, A Good Frame of Mind; and join her on Twitter @laurajajko and Google+.

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Wednesday, April 1, 2015 / Labels: , ,

Photographer Spotlight: Joe Giron

Expert photographers say that the best pictures are those that show action. Subjects that run, eat, fight, and show anything else other than stillness have the potential to become part of a good photo. This is why it’s insanely difficult to find interesting shots inside casinos where most people, especially those at the poker tables, are so absorbed into what they’re doing. 

Joe Giron
Joe Giron is one of the professionals who took on the complexity of taking pictures inside casinos and succeeded. It is because of him and his dedication to perfecting his craft that people can enjoy casino images that show emotion and action. His job as a casino photographer can be compared to that of a wildlife enthusiast who waits for hours just to take a picture of a seal emerging from one of its breathing holes. When Joe is covering a poker tournament, he waits for players to make even the slightest move, or change in their facial expression, in order to have a picture that’s good enough for a magazine. 

“For me the essence is going beyond the basic poker-face photography and capturing images that tell a story about what these players are going through to become champions, or the dejection of getting so close and falling short,” said Joe. 

One of his favorites is Will Molson’s winning shot at the Caribbean Adventure High Roller. When Molson scored first place in the 2011 poker tournament, he stood up, ran towards his dad who was standing near the rails, and hugged him. That scene was pure emotion and bliss. 



So far, Joe has covered several major poker tournaments including World Poker Tour's 12th Season, several PokerStars events, and the World Series of Poker whose satellite events last year were managed by Betfair

Before beginning his stint as a poker photographer, Joe was involved in the music business for more than 20 years. He used to be the photographer for Pantera, and stayed with the band until Dime – the band’s then lead guitarist – died in ’04. 

Click here to view some of his work.


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Saturday, March 28, 2015 / Labels: ,

2016 Light Work Artist-in-Residence Program - Call for photographers

2016 Light Work Artist-in-Residence Program - Call for photographers



March 28, 2015 /Photography News/ Each year Light Work invites 12-15 artists to participate in its residency program, including one artist co-sponsored by Autograph ABP and one artist in conjunction with the Urban Video Project (UVP). Artists selected for the residency program are invited to live in Syracuse for one month. They receive a $5,000 stipend, an apartment to stay in, a private digital studio, a private darkroom, and 24-hour access to our facility.

Participants in the residency program are expected to use their month to pursue their own projects: photographing in the area, scanning or printing for a specific project or book, and so on. Artists are not obligated to lecture at the facility, though there is a hope that the artists will be friendly and accessible to local artists and students. Work by each Artist-in-Residence becomes a part of the Light Work Collection and is published in a special edition of Contact Sheet: The Light Work Annual along with an essay commissioned by Light Work.

Eligibility:

The international residency program is open to all artists working in photography or image-based media, from any country. Submissions are reviewed regularly throughout the year and applicants may be notified at any time. 

Deadline for the 2016 round: July 1, 2015

To submit online, visit http://lightwork.slideroom.com and follow the instructions.

To view all current call for entries listed at Photography News, visit http://www.photography-news.com/2009/12/photography-competitions.html


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Wednesday, March 18, 2015 / Labels: , ,

2015 ''Our Future is on the Table!'' photo contest

2015 Our Future is on the Table! photo contest, European Development Days

March 18, 2015 /Photography News/ Would you like the chance to share your vision of our future with world leaders in Brussels? The six talented finalists of the EDD15 Photo Contest will be invited to attend Europe’s largest development forum, European Development Days 2015 on 3 & 4 June where their photos will be exhibited and they will have the opportunity to meet key actors in development and share their ideas for our future.

Each year, the production of food contributes to various strains on the environment, including water shortages, deforestation, loss of biodiversity and pollution. Small farmers are losing their lands and livelihoods to large-scale farming, and soaring food prices in recent years have posed additional threats to food security. Currently, there are still 870 million people who do not have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food. Last but not least, food plays a central role in family, social and religious life, shaping people’s identity and culture. What is your vision of how food will affect our future? This year, the European Development Days invites you to have your say on these pressing issues. By participating in the OUR FUTURE IS ON THE TABLE Photo Contest, you can show Europe how what we eat affects the world we live in with an original photo and caption. One winning photo per continent will be selected and the six finalists will get to share their thoughts with leaders from around the world at the 2015 edition of European Development Days in Brussels. Good Luck! 

Eligibility:

To enter this contest you must be between the ages of 15 and 25 at the time of entry. Entrants from all countries and territories are welcome to participate in the competition. All photo entries must be submitted with captions and texts in one of the 5 official contest languages: English, French, German, Portuguese or Spanish. You must supply full details as required by the registration form, and comply with all rules to be eligible for the prize(s). No responsibility is accepted for ineligible entries or entries made fraudulently.

Prizes:

There will be six (6) finalists, one finalist from each continent. The prize to be awarded to each finalist is a trip to Brussels in order to attend European Development Days on 3 and 4 June 2015 (accommodation, travel and a stipend for incidentals will be covered). For finalists under the age of 18, arrangements (including accommodation, travel and a stipend for incidentals) will be made for an accompanying parent or guardian. Finalists based outside the European Union who will require a visa to travel to Brussels are responsible for securing their own visas and should begin this process immediately after having been notified that they have won. The European Commission will assist by providing the necessary documents for the visa application.

EDD15 Winner:

For the winner of the EDD15 vote during the conference, the prize to be awarded is a trip to the World Expo in Milan in October 2015 (accommodation, travel and a stipend for incidentals will be covered). If the winner is under the age of 18, arrangements (including accommodation, travel and a stipend for incidentals) will be made for an accompanying parent or guardian. If the winner is based outside the European Union and requires a visa to travel to Milan, they will be responsible for securing their own visa. The European Commission will assist by providing the necessary documents for the visa application. By submitting your photo entry, you agree to take part in any contest publicity if asked to do so. The prize may only be taken as stated and cannot be changed. There will be no prize substitutions. No prize or any portion thereof is transferable or redeemable for cash.

How to apply?

Upload your original photo and caption onto our Facebook page through Woobox. Each photo should be accompanied with a short caption up to 140 characters, as well as a short story up to 1,500 characters explaining your shot. There will be six final winners: one per continent. The winners will be selected through online votes and an independent EDD jury. If you take one of the six winning photos, you will get to participate in the EDD15 and share their thoughts with leaders from around the world in Brussels. 

Deadline: 10 April 2015

Submit photos here 

To view all current call for entries listed at Photography News, visit http://www.photography-news.com/2009/12/photography-competitions.html

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Tuesday, March 17, 2015 / Labels: , ,

Photographer Spotlight: Jonathan Brooks

Self-portrait. Photo © Jonathan Brooks

March 17, 2015 /Photography News/ World Photography Network is very pleased to announce its popular segment: "Photographer Spotlight.” In this part of their newsletter they will be interviewing various fellow photographers and learning more about what motivates them, what their goals are and what direction they wish to take with their art. 

This issue's "spotlight" is on photographer Jonathan Brooks.

World Photography Network (WPN): Why have you chosen photography as your method of expression?
Jonathan Brooks (JB): I have always had a passion for art, and I used to love to sketch. Unfortunately, after two and a half years of rigorous and arduous architecture classes, I became discouraged with drawing. I quickly developed an aversion to sketching. Photography soon became my main form of artistic expression. I personally believe photography is our most powerful means of communication.

Photo © Jonathan Brooks
WPN: What best describes your particular style of photography?
JB: I would consider my style “Conceptual,” because I always like to have a hand in the final image. It doesn't matter if I'm shooting landscape, fashion, portrait, documentary or any type of photography.

WPN: Who or what do you consider your major influences?
JB: I was obsessed with the ads and photo spreads in Vogue magazines and Time Life books. I've always loved the American fashion photographer, Herb Ritts, and I consider him to be my photography idol. His images have really had a profound influence on my work, especially in my portraits and nature shots. His compositions, lighting, and use of black & white film really made his work a cut above.

Photo © Jonathan Brooks
WPN: What do you wish to achieve with your photography? Are there any particular messages or thoughts you wish to convey?
JB: I want to create beautiful, memorable, and thought-provoking images that are timeless. Since the passing of my father, death and mortality have been a prominent theme in my work. By combining still life aspects into my portraiture photography, I explore the juxtaposition of life and death through the contrast of the skull and a living subject.


WPN: What are your most recent accomplishments?
JB: My art has been featured on one of the largest (25-story-tall) billboards in Times Square, New York City. My image, “Love Floats” won the Talenthouse Creative Invite: “Photograph your Perfect Moment of Love.” It was then featured on the popular German primetime show “Nur die Liebe zählt” (Only Love Counts). I was a “Top Ten” Finalist in Digital Photo Pro and HD Video Pro magazine's “7th Annual Emerging Pro Still & Motion Competition.” One of my images, “Over the Rainbow,” received “Photo of the Year 2014” at the inaugural Miami Photo Salon during Miami's prestigious art week. My “SKULL” Series is scheduled to be featured on an upcoming episode of the CW Network's hugely popular award winning series “The Vampire Diaries.” 


Photo © Jonathan Brooks

WPN: What are your plans for future projects?
JB: I will continue to expand as an artist and to gain more exposure for my work. Upon receiving my awards from HD Video Pro and Digital Photo Pro magazines, I was able to complete my first short film “5 SKULLS” using a (then yet to be introduced to the market) RED EPIC camera. This opportunity allowed me to apply my photography aesthetics to cinematography, and through this experience I have a new-found appreciation for motion. I would like to finish a longer director’s cut of my experimental film and possibly explore more in motion. I would also like to incorporate my photography into mixed media and installation work.

WWW.JONATHANBROOKS.NET
jonathanbmiami@aol.com

Wish to be considered for the next Spotlight interview?
Please contact WPN's staff: info@wpnetwork.com

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Saturday, March 14, 2015 / Labels: , ,

In photos: Remembering Diane Arbus and her profound world

March 14, 2015 /Photography News/ Born into a wealthy Jewish family in New York 92 years ago on March 14, 1923, Diane Arbus made her reputation photographing people on the margins of society: losers, misfits, nudists, transvestites, prostitutes, the mentally retarded, sideshow freaks, and almost anyone who seemed not to fit in easily with her upper middle class background. And occasionally she photographed celebrities, sometimes to their dismay.

Diane Arbus, Untitled (3), 1970-71, © The Estate of Diane Arbus. Courtesy of Masters of Photography
At age 18 Diane married Allan Arbus (divorced 1969), an employee at her family’s store. Before separating, they worked collaboratively, first taking photographs and creating advertisements for the store, then creating commercial fashion photography for Harper’s Bazaar, Show, Esquire, Glamour, The New York Times, and Vogue.

Eddie Carmel, Jewish Giant, taken at
Home with His Parents in the Bronx, NY, 1970
After taking a brief photography course with Berenice Abbott, Arbus met Lisette Model, an Austrian-born documentary photographer, and studied with her from about 1955 to 1957. With Model’s encouragement Arbus gave up commercial work to concentrate on fine-art photography. In 1960 Esquire published Arbus’s first photo-essay, in which she effectively juxtaposed privilege and squalor in New York City. Thereafter she made a living as a freelance photographer and photography instructor.

Unlike many photographers with whom she overlapped, like Henri Cartier Bresson and Robert Frank, Arbus would often meet a subject and form a long relationship, the diaries and date books show. It could take 10 years for her to produce her best photographs of that subject.

Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey, 1967
Arbus' best-known single work is her haunting photograph of side-by-side twin girls, whose identical faces are just enough different that they seem like a paradigm of good and evil, darkness and light. Stanley Kubrick liked them so much he alluded to the pair with the creepy children who haunt the giant hotel in his movie "The Shining."

Toward the end of her life, she explicitly described her work in those terms. "I do feel I have some slight corner on something about the quality of things. I mean it's very subtle and a little embarrassing to me, but I really believe there are things which nobody would see unless I photographed them."

Arbus experienced "depressive episodes" during her life similar to those experienced by her mother, and the episodes may have been worsened by symptoms of hepatitis. Arbus wrote in 1968 "I go up and down a lot," and her ex-husband noted that she had "violent changes of mood." On July 26, 1971, while living at Westbeth Artists Community in New York City, Arbus took her own life by ingesting barbiturates and slashing her wrists with a razor. Her good friend Marvin Israel found her body in the bathtub two days later; she was 48 years old.

Diane Arbus, Teenager with a Baseball Bat, NYC, 196
Today Arbus, who once said her pictures sought to capture “the space between who someone is and who they think they are,” has become one of America’s best-known photographers and one of its most controversial.

Diane Arbus, Untitled (1), 1970-71, © The Estate of Diane Arbus. Courtesy of Masters of Photography
A collection of her photos was published in 1972 in connection with a successful major exhibition of her work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. That same year her work was shown at the Venice Biennale, marking the first time that an American photographer received that distinction. In 2003 an extensive exhibition of her work opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and later traveled throughout the United States and Europe. An accompanying book, Diane Arbus Revelations (2003), contained some 200 photographs as well as excerpts from her letters and notebooks. In 2007 Arbus’s estate gifted her complete archives - including photographic equipment, diary pages, and the negatives of some 7,500 rolls of film - to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.


Diane Arbus, Mexican dwarf in his hotel room in N.Y.C., 1970, © The Estate of Diane Arbus. Courtesy of Masters of Photography
Diane Arbus, Untitled (7), 1970-71, © The Estate of Diane Arbus. Courtesy of Masters of Photography
Diane Arbus, A young man with curlers at home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C., 1966, © The Estate of Diane Arbus. Courtesy of Masters of Photography
Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962)


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Thursday, March 5, 2015 / Labels: , ,

Remembering inventor and pioneering photographer Jules Dubosq

March 5, 2015 /Photography News/ Born 198 years ago today, on March 5, 1817, Louis Jules Dubosq was a French instrument maker, inventor, and pioneering photographer.

Remembering Inventor and Pioneering Photographer Jules Dubosq, stereoscope
"Still life with skull", by Louis Jules Duboscq, ca. 1850
In 1844 David Brewster invented the stereoscope, a new invention that could take photographic images in 3D. Later, Louis Jules Duboscq took Brewster's invention, improved on it, began to manufacture the apparatus as well as to produce stereoscopic images. 

In 1851, Dubosq dispayed his pictures in London where the stereoscope attracted the attention of Queen Victoria during one of her visits at Crystal Palace. As a consequence several British and continental makers started to produce stereoscopes and stereoscopic images, and within a few years hundreds of thousands of stereoscopes were sold. 

In 1855, together with the chemist Henri Edme Robiquet, Dubosq improved the method of preserving dry collodion plates, and in 1861, he proposed the polyconograph, a camera attachment with a series of movable plateholders, which made it possible to produce a large number of small pictures on a single plate. 

In the 1860s the famous microphotographs of Rene Dagron were produced with Dubosq's equipment, and in the same years Dubosq presented an arc-light apparatus for enlarging photographic images. 

Dubosq also made several pioneering experiments on moving image technology. 

Among other instruments he built were a colorimeter, a polarimeter, and a heliostat.

Duboscq won medals at the World's Fair  in London in 1851, and in Paris in 1855 and 1856. In 1853 he published Practical Rules For Photography which discussed his apparatus. He was also an Officer of the Legion of Honour.

Dubosq died on September 24, 1886.

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Saturday, February 28, 2015 / Labels: , ,

DIY: Free printable DSLR lens hoods

February 28, 2015 /Photography News/ It isn't that lens hoods are really expensive, but if you hardly ever need one, you can probably find a better way to spend the $10-50 a lens hood would set you back.

lenshoods.co.uk and lenshoods.net are two nearly identical websites that offer free printable lens hood templates for a huge list of lenses. The only difference with lenshoods.net is that it offers hoods that are “optimized” for crop sensor cameras. Whether you need a hood for a Canon prime, a Nikon telephoto, or a Sigma macro lens, you'll find that on both sites. Templates are available in PDF format and nearly every lens has a standard round hood and a petaled hood available.

Here’s what the templates look like:

free printable lens hoods


All you need to do is print out the template (on A4, A3, or A2 paper), cut it out of black card stock, and assemble it with tape or glue.

The resulting lens hood may not make your camera look more impressive, and may not be as effective as the real thing, but you'll get it for the price of the paper you print on. 

If you’d like to have a unique looking hood for your lens, you can also design your own custom lens hood.  

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015 / Labels: , ,

In pictures: The 2015 Sony World Photography Awards finalists



February 24, 2015 /Photography News/ The 2015 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards today announces the shortlists for its Professional, Open and Youth categories.

Recognising and rewarding the world’s best contemporary photography from the last year, the 2015 competition received the highest number of entries in its eight year history – 173,444 images from 171 countries – and a 24% increase on 2014.

Speaking about the shortlisted images, Astrid Merget Motsenigos, Creative Director of the World Photography Organisation and organiser of the awards said: 

“The sole purpose of the Sony World Photography Awards is to celebrate and appreciate the talented artists working in the photographic industry.  Once again, the shortlist demonstrates the vibrancy, diversity and skill of both today’s established photographers and, as importantly, the growing army of citizen photographers for whom the awards offer unpreceded exposure and opportunity.

“The record number of entries gave our expert panel of judges a monumental task but we are incredibly proud to present to you a shortlist which truly showcases some of the world’s best photography.” 

The shortlisted photographers for all categories are listed below and names included are both new and familiar to the competition.  Those recognised again by the awards include: Peter Franck (Germany); Donald Webber (Canada); Amit Madheshiya (India); Brent Stirton (South Africa); Simon Norfolk (UK), Fan Li (China) and Massimo Siragusa (Italy).  New names include Julia Fullerton-Batten (UK) and Sebastian Gil Miranda (France).  

Those in the awards’ Professional categories will now compete for a $25,000 prize and the coveted L’Iris d’Or/ Photographer of the Year title.  The recipient, along with the winners of the Professional categories, overall Youth and Student winners plus the Open Photographer of the Year, who receives a $5,000 prize, will all be announced at the Sony World Photography Awards Gala Ceremony on Thursday 23 April.  All winners will receive the latest digital imaging equipment from Sony.

The winning and shortlisted images will go on show at Somerset House, London from 24 April – 10 May and published in the 2015 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards book.  The images will be printed by theprintspace, WPO's Official Exhibition Printer.  The exhibition will also include an intimate display of still images, books and films by Elliott Erwitt, recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Photography award.

Here is a selection of the best shortlisted images:


Copyright: ©Adrian Jaszczak, Poland, Shortlist, Arts&Culture, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Headless. Image Description: Photo taken during Artistic Gymnastics Tournament in Poland. Girls that participated were aged 8-12.
Copyright: ©Adrian Jaszczak, Poland, Shortlist, Arts&Culture, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Headless. Image Description: Photo taken during Artistic Gymnastics Tournament in Poland. Girls that participated were aged 8-12.
Copyright: ©Daesung Lee, Republic of Korea, Shortlist, Conceptual, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Series Name: Futuristic Archaeology. Series Description: Still 35% of Mongolians are living a nomadic life and depend on their land for survival. This is increasingly difficult due to serious changes: 25% of the Mongolianland has turned into desert in the past 30 years. Potentially 75 % of Mongolian territory is at risk of desertification. These environmental changes directly threaten the Mongolian nomadic way of life, which has been passed from generation to generation. This project attempts at recreating the museum diorama with actual people and their livestock in a real place where decertifying in Mongolia. It is based on an imagination that these people try to go into museum diorama for survival in the future. This is accomplished with printed images on a billboard placed in conjunction with the actual landscape horizon. I hope to accomplish a sense that the lives of these nomadic people occur between this reality and a virtual space of a museum. Mongolian traditional nomadic lifestyle might be existed only in museum in the future.
Copyright: ©Daesung Lee, Republic of Korea, Shortlist, Conceptual, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Series Name: Futuristic Archaeology. Series Description: Still 35% of Mongolians are living a nomadic life and depend on their land for survival. This is increasingly difficult due to serious changes: 25% of the Mongolianland has turned into desert in the past 30 years. Potentially 75 % of Mongolian territory is at risk of desertification. These environmental changes directly threaten the Mongolian nomadic way of life, which has been passed from generation to generation. This project attempts at recreating the museum diorama with actual people and their livestock in a real place where decertifying in Mongolia. It is based on an imagination that these people try to go into museum diorama for survival in the future. This is accomplished with printed images on a billboard placed in conjunction with the actual landscape horizon. I hope to accomplish a sense that the lives of these nomadic people occur between this reality and a virtual space of a museum. Mongolian traditional nomadic lifestyle might be existed only in museum in the future.

Copyright: ©Gili Yaari, Israel, Shortlist, Arts & Culture, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image name: Purim Holiday in Jerusalem. Description: Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men of the Toldot Aharon Sect celebrate the Purim holiday in the ultra-orthodox Mea Shearim neighborhood in Jerusalem on March 17, 2014. The festival of Purim commemorates the rescue of Jews from a genocide in ancient Persia.
Copyright: ©Gili Yaari, Israel, Shortlist, Arts & Culture, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image name: Purim Holiday in Jerusalem. Description: Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men of the Toldot Aharon Sect celebrate the Purim holiday in the ultra-orthodox Mea Shearim neighborhood in Jerusalem on March 17, 2014. The festival of Purim commemorates the rescue of Jews from a genocide in ancient Persia.

Copyright: ©Harfian Herdi, Indonesia, Shortlist, Nature &Wildlife, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Frog story. Description: Three cute frog at the morning lights
Copyright: ©Harfian Herdi, Indonesia, Shortlist, Nature &Wildlife, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Frog story. Description: Three cute frog at the morning lights


Copyright: (c) Kimmo Metsaranta, Finland, Shortlist, Still Life, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Series Name: Animal Behaviour
Copyright: (c) Kimmo Metsaranta, Finland, Shortlist, Still Life, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Series Name: Animal Behaviour

Copyright: ©Lisa Krantz, United States, Shortlisted, Contemporary Issues, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity. Image Description: At almost 600 pounds, Hector Garcia Jr. finds simple daily tasks like bathing a challenge. He struggled to walk across the hall from his bedroom to the bathroom so that his mother, Elena, could wash him after having cut his hair in November 2010. A month before, Hector started dieting after he realized he was close to his highest known weight, 636 pounds.
Copyright: ©Lisa Krantz, United States, Shortlisted, Contemporary Issues, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity. Image Description: At almost 600 pounds, Hector Garcia Jr. finds simple daily tasks like bathing a challenge. He struggled to walk across the hall from his bedroom to the bathroom so that his mother, Elena, could wash him after having cut his hair in November 2010. A month before, Hector started dieting after he realized he was close to his highest known weight, 636 pounds. 

Copyright: (c) Liza Van der Stock, Belgium, Shortlist, People, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Maurice and Lisa. Image Description: Maurice and Lisa shooting a scene. Series Name: Paradi$e Lu$t. Series Description: In a Flemish village, surrounded by nature, Laura and Maurice live together with their daughter Eva. In the garden, Eva plays with her dog or meets with her classmates. Friends and family come along and fill the house with activity. But when Eva is at school, Maurice and Laura shoot what most people prefer to keep to themselves. The porn they make is not populated by Barbies or muscled superheroes. Ordinary women play with men who are also dad or neighbour. A humanity that not only exists in the porn they make, but also emerges behind the scenes and in their family life. In recent years, Laura has built strong bonds with a number of like-minded people: every one of them confident women who have consciously chosen this lifestyle and only depend on themselves with respect to their work. On a regular basis, they go to erotic fairs, rendez-vous evenings or an erotic night club: to make money or to have fun - or both.
Copyright: (c) Liza Van der Stock, Belgium, Shortlist, People, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Maurice and Lisa. Image Description: Maurice and Lisa shooting a scene. Series Name: Paradi$e Lu$t. Series Description: In a Flemish village, surrounded by nature, Laura and Maurice live together with their daughter Eva. In the garden, Eva plays with her dog or meets with her classmates. Friends and family come along and fill the house with activity. But when Eva is at school, Maurice and Laura shoot what most people prefer to keep to themselves. The porn they make is not populated by Barbies or muscled superheroes. Ordinary women play with men who are also dad or neighbour. A humanity that not only exists in the porn they make, but also emerges behind the scenes and in their family life. In recent years, Laura has built strong bonds with a number of like-minded people: every one of them confident women who have consciously chosen this lifestyle and only depend on themselves with respect to their work. On a regular basis, they go to erotic fairs, rendez-vous evenings or an erotic night club: to make money or to have fun - or both.


Copyright: ©Saeed Barikani, Iran, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Old Shepherd. Image Description: An old shepherd that had been surprised by snow storm in Gilan's countryside in the north of Iran
Copyright: ©Saeed Barikani, Iran, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: Old Shepherd. Image Description: An old shepherd that had been surprised by snow storm in Gilan's countryside in the north of Iran


Copyright: Vladyslav Musiienko / UNIAN, Ukraine, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Description: Ukrainian protester plays piano on a barricade in front of the riot police line during the continuing protest in Kiev, Ukraine 10.02.2014
Copyright: Vladyslav Musiienko / UNIAN, Ukraine, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Description: Ukrainian protester plays piano on a barricade in front of the riot police line during the continuing protest in Kiev, Ukraine 10.02.2014
Copyright: ©Simon Morris, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: On the Tundra.... Description: A Young Nenets boy plays in -40 degrees on Yamal in the Winter in Siberia.
Copyright: ©Simon Morris, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Image Name: On the Tundra.... Description: A Young Nenets boy plays in -40 degrees on Yamal in the Winter in Siberia.



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Monday, February 23, 2015 / Labels: ,

The fascinating technique that lets you capture sound waves on camera

February 23, 2015 /Photography News/ Did you ever wonder what different sounds look like? Thanks to the science behind the Schlieren Flow Visualization now you can see and capture the differences in air pressure caused by various forces such as sound or heat.

So, how does it work?

Here is a graphic that depicts how we are able to photograph movement in the airwaves, thus creating sound waves, by using a a series of objects to reflect and divert the waves for the camera to be able to capture it.

How to photograph sound


This results in a photograph - like the one below - which shows the sound waves created by a pair of clapping hands.

The fascinating technique that lets you capture sound waves on camera explained


Check out the full video here, and tell us what sounds you'd most like to see in the comments box.


And here is how you can create your own DIY Schlieren Flow Visualization: http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Schlieren-Flow-Visualization/

Want more information on the Schlieren photography technique? Check out the great resources below:

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Friday, February 20, 2015 / Labels: , ,

TeraBella Media Presents: The Open Portfolio 2015 Call for Entries

TBM Stock Image

February 20, 2015 /Photography News/ Whether your passion is landscape, portrait, documentary/street or something entirely unique, TeraBella Media (TBM) is interested in displaying your interpretations. TBM is inviting all photographers to send images that best represent their own personal style. The subject matter is open for each photographer. Image files may be in black and white and/or color. Participants may submit up to eight images that are most characteristic of their individual photographic approach. First, Second and Third place finalists will be chosen. Additionally, three Honorable Mentions and Three Merit winners will be selected.

Prizes:

First Place: $400 (USD) cash prize
Second Place: $200 (USD) cash prize
Third Place: $100 (USD) cash prize

Three (3) Honorable Mentions & three (3) Merit Winners will also be chosen.

All finalists will be announced in the TBMPN/WPN newsletter and on Photography News. Finalists will also receive recognition in on line gallery display and social media exposure via Facebook and Twitter.

Copyright: All submitted images remain sole property of artist/photographer.

Entry Fee(s): $20 (USD) for first 4 images
(Up to 8 image entries may be submitted for additional fees)
Color and/or Black and White images will be accepted.

Eligibility: Contest is open to all individuals 18 years and older, worldwide.

Entry Deadline: April 1, 2015 (11:59PM CST)


To view all current call for entries listed at Photography News, visit http://www.photography-news.com/2009/12/photography-competitions.html

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Saturday, February 14, 2015 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Valentine Love From the Early 20th Century

February 14, 2015 /Photography News/ Here is a collection of photographs from the beginning of the 20th century. Happy Valentine's Day!

Zulu couple, 1903. (via Okinawa Soba)
Young couple chalking hearts onto a tree. Valentine's Day, 1944. The Galt Museum & Archives
The kiss
Young couple seated in garden, circa 1900. Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, Powerhouse Museum. Gift of the Estate of Raymond W Phillips, 2008.


Margaret Ballardini & Fred Watson, Luna Park, St Kilda, Victoria, ca. 1927. Photographed by M D True, Electric Studio.

Soldier's goodbye & Bobbie the cat, ca. 1939-ca. 1945 / by Sam Hood. The State Library of New South Wales.
Sydney, NSW. 1919. A wounded AIF soldier receives an affectionate welcome home at the Anzac Buffet in The Domain. This photograph is from the Australian War Memorial's collection.


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Thursday, February 12, 2015 / Labels: , ,

In Photos: Remembering French Photographer Eugène Atget

February 12, 2015 /Photography News/ Born 158 years ago today, on February 12, 1857, in Libourne near Bordeaux and raised by his uncle, Eugène Atget’s youth was molded by his time as a sailor. Upon his return from the sea, Atget turned to the stage and pursued an acting career. After minor success as an actor, Atget abandoned the stage and at the age of forty took up painting, then quickly turned to his true life’s work as a photographer. For the next thirty years, until just a few short months before his death in 1927, Atget undertook a systematic documentation of the city of Paris, creating approximately five thousand negatives and nearly ten thousand prints.

Because he refused to work with the latest advances in photographic technology, Atget’s images evoke a sense of timelessness, due in part to the slower exposure times and the pre-visualization of the final image that was required. Atget produced glass plate negatives, using an 18 x 24 cm. view camera that was fitted with a brass rectilinear lens and had no shutter. Rather, Atget would simply remove the cap from the lens and capture the scene before him, allowing any motion to appear as a blur. Atget carried this large camera around Paris as he worked to document its essential elements: streets, shop windows, building facades, architectural details, and the landscape of the public gardens and parks in and around the city.

Atget’s unique documentation of the French capital captured the eye of surrealist photographer Man Ray who worked to promote Atget as one of the pre-eminent photographic modernists. Later, the efforts of Berenice Abbott, who acquired Atget’s negatives and prints after his death, finally situated Atget’s work in the history of photography where it continues to gain in stature and influence.

George Eastman House holds approximately 500 prints by Eugène Atget.

Marchard d'abat-jour, rue Lepic. 1899-1900

Au Port Salut - Cabaret Rue des Fosses St. Jacques (5e). 1903

Brocanteur 38 rue Descartes (5e arr). 1909

Porte d’Italie. - zone des fortifications - va disparaitre (chiffonniers) (18e arr). 1913
Au Tambour, 63 quai de la Tournelle (5e arr). 1908

Cour de Rouen - passage du Commerce (6e ar). 1908

Courtesy of the George Eastman House



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